Photo of Kevin Parker, 2013

Welcome to Kevin Parker's ePortfolio!

ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-0549-3687

I serve as Chair and Professor of Informatics and Computer Science at Idaho State University. The department is affiliated with both the College of Business and the College of Science and Engineering, affording me the opportunity to work with two deans in matters of accreditation, development, and strategic planning for the department and the colleges. Click here for more details about my admininstrative experience.

I guided the formation of our department as it came into being through the strategic alliance of ISU's most prominent computing-intensive majors, Computer Information Systems and Computer Science. The transition brought together faculty from similar yet diverse technological fields. I was responsible for multiple searches in which we recruited, assessed, and subsequently hired six exceptional faculty members across three successful programs, Business Informatics, Health Informatics, and Computer Science. I have since mentored and worked closely with those faculty members in both teaching and research, forging the department into a dynamic and vibrant unit.

The department now has ten faculty members and offers one graduate major, three undergraduate majors, one post-baccalaureate certificate, and two minors. Other graduate degrees are in various stages of the proposal process.

Our curriculum is made up of courses designed to provide students with the strong technical background needed to develop solutions to today's information challenges. There is a multitude of opportunities for trained and skilled professionals in every sector of society who can turn information into actionable knowledge.

My background spans both computer science and information systems, making me a true informaticist. I have been involved in informatics and computer science for over 30 years, and in higher education for over 25 years.

My goal is to continue to improve as an administrator, researcher, and teacher. I continue to learn as I encounter new administrative challenges, and I strive to share my passion for learning as I mentor our junior faculty.

Administrative Experience

1999 to present Idaho State University
College of Business / College of Science and Engineering
Chair of Informatics and Computer Science Expand section.

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Interface with the deans of the College of Business and the College of Science and Engineering to administer a department that capitalizes on the strengths of two colleges.
  • Identify and harness the synergies between two similar but different programs in order to reduce redundancies and strengthen both programs while maintaining their individual identities.
  • Analyze and determine factors that differentiate our programs from others in order to promote a competitive advantage.
  • Provide vision and dynamic leadership to the department and college; lead and represent the academic programs within the department.
  • Help guide the college as member of the Executive Committee, including acting in an advisory capacity to the dean and interacting with our Leadership Board.
  • Act as a liaison for the college and department with University administration to promote our majors and our accomplishments.
  • Work with the college’s development officer to identify, cultivate, solicit, and steward philanthropic gifts.
  • Work closely with the dean to map the short and long-term strategies for program growth and expansion.
  • Provide leadership and needed oversight to all matters related to accreditation.

Key Accomplishments:

  • Successfully managed the merger of the Computer Information Systems department in the College of Business and the Computer Science department in the College of Science and Engineering.
  • Chaired two successful searches for faculty members specializing in Health Informatics.
  • Teamed with the department to overhaul the Business Informatics curriculum.
  • Directed the genesis of the Health Informatics curriculum.
  • Chaired a successful search for a dual Systems Administrator/Informatics professor.
  • Crafted a successful proposal for Informatics and Programming I to serve as a General Education requirement.
  • Chaired a successful search for a Computer Science professor.
  • Chaired a successful search for an Informatics and CS non-tenure track professor.
  • Collaborated with the dean in the development of a proposal for a Master of Science in Health Informatics.
  • Partnered with the dean to formulate a proposal for a School of Informatics and Computational Sciences.
  • Recently participated in our 2016 AACSB accreditation.
2013–present
Chair of Computer Information Systems Expand section.

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Plan curriculum in consultation with the department faculty in terms of department goals and university mission.
  • Plan course development and review in consultation with the department faculty in terms of department goals and university mission.
  • Oversee department marketing and communications, including department websites and social networking sites.
  • Provide leadership for the department in all professional matters, including coordinating activities and maintaining high-quality performance in teaching and research.
  • Give leadership and needed oversight to planning and marketing, and all initiatives related to teaching, service, research, and development.

Key Accomplishments:

  • Completed the American Council on Education (ACE) Leadership Academy for Department Chairs.
  • Crafted a successful proposal for Digital Information Literacy to serve as a General Education requirement.
  • Chaired a successful search for our initial faculty member specializing in Health Informatics.
2012–2013

The Department of Informatics and Computer Science is more complex than typical departments because it resides in and spans two colleges and offers multiple undergraduate degrees including Business Informatics, Health Care Informatics, and Computer Science, and a Master of Science in Health Informatics. Leading a diverse department often offers special challenges, requiring an individual with the breadth to deal with a wide range of issues, people, institutions, and constituencies.

  • Administrative Milestones Expand section.
    Year Date Milestone
    2015 August 13 Approval of Master of Science in Health Informatics by State Board of Education
    May 12 Genesis of the Applied Informatics Team
    2014 November 18 Successful clinical informatics faculty search (Holmes)
    November 10 Successful CS faculty search (Edwards)
    October 16 Business Informatics name change and curriculum revisions approved by UCC
    October 16 Health Informatics name change and curriculum revisions approved by UCC
    October 10 INFO 1181 approved as General Ed Critical Thinking Objective
    October 9 Proposal for MS in Health Informatics submitted to Graduate Council
    August 3 Successful clinical statistics faculty search (Peterson)
    July 29 ICS approved for membership in NCWIT Academic Alliance
    January 16 Successful clinical Informatics professor/Systems Admin search (Houghton)
    2013 November 20 Business Informatics curriculum revision approved
    November 20 Health Informatics curriculum revision approved
    October 10 Successful Informatics faculty search #3 (Kordzadeh)
    October 9 Successful Informatics faculty search #2 (Bozan)
    August 21 Named chair of Informatics and Computer Science
    March 19 Successful Informatics faculty search #1 (Srinivasan)
    2012 November 13 CIS 1101 approved as General Ed Information Literacy Objective
    October 15-16 Attended American Council on Education (ACE) Leadership Academy for Department Chairs
    July 22 Began serving as chair of CIS
  • Leadership Philosophy Expand section.

    Leadership involves more than carrying out administrative duties like planning, assessing, monitoring, coordinating, hiring, firing, etc. A leader is responsible for leading people. An academic leader's responsibilities subsume both leadership and administration.

    Here are some traits that I consider vital to a leader:

    • An academic leader must advocate for their College and faculty, even while supporting students, their administrative superiors, and other stakeholders. Leaders cannot place their needs above those of the college. Academic leaders must not view their position merely as a vehicle for career advancement.
    • A leader must be decisive. While it is critical to gather as many facts as possible before making decision, it is vital to be able to make a decision. At the same time it is essential to be aware of the big picture. There is a multitude of political, financial, and environmental factors that must be taken into account when making any decision.
    • A leader must be forward-thinking, proactive, innovative, and willing to embrace change. While this is demanded of all leaders, it is especially critical to a leader in any technology-driven discipline.
    • A leader must know the stakeholders being served. Administrators are the primary spokespersons for their faculty, staff, and students. They are responsible for implementing policies for central administration. Other stakeholders include accrediting agencies, state boards of education, granting agencies, local employers, and alumni.
    • A leader must take the lead. If something must be accomplished then the leader may need to personally get the ball rolling.
    • A leader must be willing to listen to honest feedback. Leaders who surround themselves with "yes men" do themselves a disservice. Every leader needs people who are not afraid to point out when they think the chair is advocating a bad course of action, or when he is simply being a jerk. A successful leader must be honest, fair, and open to new ideas, and must realize that he or she isn't always right.
    • Leadership is a collaborative venture. Whenever possible it is vastly preferable to convince others to get onboard than it is to force them to comply. A leader should be transparent by sharing facts and constraints with faculty whenever possible. Faculty should be involved in the decision-making process and a leader should work toward establishing a consensus whenever possible, but avoid leading by consensus. A leader should not be afraid to rely on others for help and must be willing to delegate.
    • A leader must be equitable. All faculty members should be treated equitably and, whenever possible, equally. While it is vital to recognize faculty achievements or service, no faculty member should ever feel marginalized. A leader should never give special treatment in exchange for support, and should take care to avoid engendering a culture of haves and have nots.
    • A leader should treat others as he or she would like others to treat him or her. A leader should act as a mentor and set a good example, listen and respond thoughtfully to people's concerns, rely on the wisdom of others, care about those with whom he or she works, be considerate of everyone.
  • Leadership Aspects Expand section.

    The following is a list of leadership aspects to which I aspire*.

    • Excellence
      Exemplifies excellence, and expects it in students, faculty, and staff.
    • Creative and daring
      Thinks and acts innovatively, as befits a proactive school.
    • Morale Boosting
      Avoids a culture of negativity; cultivates enthusiastic, constructive engagement and collaboration – a fun and lively place of learning.
    • Principled
      Works with openness, fairness, and integrity, and strives to earn the trust of those who report to her/him, and those to whom s/he reports.
    • Responsible
      Accepts responsibility for hard decisions, placing student success and the university's core values ahead of personal and political loyalties.
    • Inquisitive
      Embraces transdisciplinary, interdisciplinary, visionary, and experiential approaches to teaching and learning.
    • Cosmopolitan
      Encourages and seeks diversity and pluralism along many dimensions.
    • Managerial
      Has experience with the intricacies of administration, delegating where appropriate, but informed on processes and procedures.
    • Ambassadorial
      Can represent the college, as well as the university, to external stakeholders in a way that is accurate and engaging.
    • Encouraging
      Acknowledges the importance of professional growth in his/her own administrative role, and supports and encourages it for faculty and staff as well.

    *Borrowed and adapted from Kevin Kirby, Dean of the College of Informatics at Northern Kentucky University.

  • Administrative Responsibilities Expand section.

    Having previously served as the Chair of the Department of Computer Information Systems, I became chair of the Department of Informatics and Computer Science when it was formed in 2013 from the strategic alliance between the CIS department in the College of Business and the Computer Science program in the College of Science and Engineering.

    The Department of Informatics and Computer Science is housed jointly within the ISU College of Business and the College of Science and Engineering, and faculty report to their original college through the chair. As department chair I report to both college deans, with the dean of the College of Business taking the lead.

    The Computer Science faculty consists of the program coordinator, a recent hire with exceptional qualifications, and three professors who, prior to the program consolidation, held joint appointments in both Computer Science and Computer Information Systems. The Informatics faculty consists of the Dean of the College of Business, the aforementioned three professors with joint appointments, three Informatics faculty members who specialize in Health Care Informatics, and a Professor of Practice who teaches software development courses in both disciplines. The Informatics and Computer Science Department is closely affiliated with the Informatics Research Institute, which offers the Information Assurance Program.

    My responsibilities include directing and overseeing all matters related to the department including accreditation, program planning and review, developing and achieving annual goals and objectives, and faculty training, supervision, and development. I also serve as liaison to the University and both Colleges. My duties and responsibilities include the following:

    Department Administration:

    1. Provide leadership for the department in all professional matters, including coordinating activities and maintaining high-quality performance in teaching and research.
    2. Give leadership and needed oversight to all matters related to planning and marketing, and all initiatives related to teaching, service, research, and development.
    3. Conduct regular department meetings; establish department committees as needed.
    4. Develop and maintain department policies — in consultation with faculty — related to students particularly in the area of admission to department major, approve graduation lists, supervise teaching major and minor programs, determine students’ eligibility, help direct graduate work and research in the department.
    5. Supervise compliance to all university, college, and department policies and procedures and initiate periodic review and/or proposed revision of the same.
    6. Oversee department marketing and communications, including department websites and social networking sites.
    7. Responsible for a small department budget that covers office supplies, equipment, communication, travel, and accreditation expenses.
    8. Interact with area employers and alumni to promote the program and its students for internships and employment opportunities for graduates.
    9. Work with the college’s development officer to identify, cultivate, solicit, and steward philanthropic gifts.

    Curriculum and Instruction:

    1. Give leadership and needed oversight to all matters related to accreditation.
    2. Oversee development and review of academic programs and offerings.
    3. Plan curriculum in consultation with the department faculty in terms of department goals and university mission.
    4. Plan course development and review in consultation with the department faculty in terms of department goals and university mission.
    5. In consultation with department faculty, schedule classes, develop catalog copy, provide and coordinate teaching area with faculty experience and goals.

    Faculty Matters:

    1. Provide overall leadership and direction to department faculty.
    2. Assign responsibilities such as teaching and intra department committee work.
    3. Encourage a collegial and positive department environment that promotes excellence in teaching, research, and service.
    4. Develop and implement a fair and balanced workload policy.
    5. Supervise and evaluate faculty performance, encourage the development of faculty member’s special talents or interests, and encourage good teaching in the department.
    6. Ensure the timely completion of faculty activity reports and annual evaluations. Give periodic feedback and coaching to faculty as needed.
    7. Oversee all matters related to faculty recruitment and retention; organize and conduct the search process for new faculty, including writing job postings, assessing candidate qualifications, conducting telephone interviews, organizing campus visits, and verifying references.
    8. Recruit and supervise adjunct faculty.
    9. Oversee textbook orders for all faculty including adjuncts.
    10. Provide or arrange mentoring for new faculty in teaching, research, and service.
    11. Organize and oversee the work of department committees as needed.
    12. Facilitate and encourage faculty members’ participation in professional meetings and other professional activities.
    13. Assist junior faculty with promotion and tenure issues.
    14. Approve time reporting and travel funding for department faculty.

    Student Matters:

    1. Assist with student recruitment, including the preparation of department brochures and information for student recruitment, as well as admissions and retention policies and activities.
    2. Direct and oversee all matters related to advising and counseling students.
    3. Promote student professional organizations and encourage faculty and student interaction.
    4. Maintain an open and responsive communication policy with students and meet with student representatives as needed.
    5. Assist students with prerequisite requirements, overrides, petitions, and course scheduling issues.
    6. In consultation with the dean and associate dean, participate in the student appeals process.
    7. Conduct student exit interviews as appropriate.
    8. Coordinate the promotion and administration of student scholarships; continue to develop new student scholarship opportunities.
    9. Approve and oversee student internships as necessary.

    College Matters:

    1. Undertake all educational and/or administrative tasks as assigned by the dean.
    2. Represent the department in the college executive committee, which meets weekly to provide recommendations to the dean.
    3. Represent the department in interactions with the Leadership Board, which works with the College and the Dean to promote, direct, advocate, and assist College leadership, while raising the College brand internally and externally.
    4. Provide input to the dean as requested to assist in his day-to-day decision making.
    5. Review and make recommendations to the dean on all matters related to appointments, promotions, tenure, changes in salaries, leaves of absence, sabbaticals, periodic performance reviews, dismissals, or other matters affecting department faculty.
    6. Assist in communicating issues and directives of the dean to department faculty.
    7. Keep department faculty members informed of department, college, and institutional plans, activities, and initiatives.
    8. Represent department interests to the Administration.
    9. Serve as a liaison between the department and other departments both within and beyond the college, recognizing and developing strategies to best derive benefits from similarities in teaching or research topics.
    10. Interact with Central Advising to promote the department and its programs.

    General Duties:

    1. Assist in budget decisions at the college level; encourage faculty members to submit proposals for grants; set priorities for use of travel funds; manage department facilities and equipment.

Academic Experience

1999 to present Idaho State University
College of Business / College of Science and Engineering
Chair and Professor of Informatics and Computer Science 2013–present
Chair and Professor of Computer Information Systems 2012–2013
Professor of Computer Information Systems 2005–2012
Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems 2004–2005
Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems 1999–2004
2007 (sabbatical) Curtin University of Technology
School of Information Systems
Research Fellow and Visiting Professor of Information Systems
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Conducted a research seminar on a Structured Process for Programming Language Selection.
    • Conducted a research seminar on the Use of Pedagogical Agents for Core Concept Tutorials.
    • Presented summary of past and ongoing research to the members of the Digital Ecosystems and Business Intelligence (DEBII) Centre, a Tier 1 University Research Centre.
    • Appointed International Linkage Member of the DEBII Centre
    • Participated in multiple research projects.
    • See sabbatical report.
2007 (sabbatical) RMIT University
School of Business Information Technology
Contractor Consultant of Business Information Technology
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Conducted a research symposium for the BIT faculty on a formal approach for selecting a programming language for computer programming courses.
    • Conducted a roundtable discussion of the use of animated pedagogical agents to deliver review materials for students and the potential of developing a tool to facilitate the creation of such review materials.
    • Assisted in teaching an Internet for Business summer course.
    • Participated in multiple research projects.
    • See sabbatical report.
1995-1999 Saint Louis University
School of Business and Administration
Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Concentrated on curriculum building and course development.
    • Participated in the restructuring of the undergraduate MIS curriculum.
    • Played an integral role in the development of a new Master of Science in MIS program.
    • Restructured and instructed courses in Systems Analysis and Design, Database Management Systems using Oracle, Emerging Technologies, and Object-Oriented Programming (both C++ and Java).
    • Assisted in the development of an Advanced Internet Technologies class.
    • Served as a member of the recruiting and interview team for new assistant professors and instructors.
    • Advised students in course selection as well as career decisions.
    • Received outstanding student evaluations for every semester taught.
1990-1991 Texas Tech University
College of Engineering
Research Assistant
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Researched single board computer platforms for the module-level controller of a semiconductor processing system for FSI International.
1985-1989 New Mexico Junior College
Division of Business and Technology
Instructor
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Instructed courses dealing with fundamental computer science and information systems concepts, application software use, programming languages and techniques, advanced data structures, and microcomputer operating systems and usage.
    • Managed the microcomputer laboratories, which included the selection of microcomputer systems and application software, as well as the supervision of student laboratory assistants.
    • Spearheaded curriculum revisions and was responsible for the development of several new courses, including Microcomputer Literacy and Advanced Data Structures.
    • Conducted seminars for area businesses on various productivity software packages.
1984 New Mexico Junior College
Division of Business and Technology
Adjunct Computer Science Instructor
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Instructed an introductory Pascal programming course emphasizing structured programming.
    • Instructed an introductory programming course explaining the fundamentals of the BASIC programming language.
1984 University of the Southwest
Department of Business Administration
Adjunct Computer Science Instructor
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Instructed an introductory Pascal programming course on microcomputers emphasizing structured programming.

Practitioner Experience

1982-1984 Conoco, Inc.
Systems Group: Hobbs Division
Programmer/Analyst 1983-1984
Programmer 1982-1983
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Independently performed 50% of all systems development activities including software analysis, design, implementation, testing, and maintenance.
    • Trained users regarding technical aspects of software.
    • Developed users' manuals and technical documentation.
    • Responsible for various development projects including production control software, system interface packages, and report generation packages.
    • Participated in the conversion from an IBM 1800 to a DEC PDP 11/34, including the design of replacement software.
1981 Conoco, Inc.
Systems Group: Hobbs Division
Systems Assistant
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Modified and upgraded existing software packages.
    • Participated in the analysis and design of new software packages.
1980 New Mexico Junior College
Division of Business and Technology
Assistant Operator/Programmer
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Performed computer operations.
    • Evaluated and upgraded software packages.

Consulting Experience

2003 AgraServ, Incorporated
Database Design Consultant
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Assisted with the database design phase of a herbicide application tracking system.
2000-present Go-Kauai.com
Web Site Design and Maintenance
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
2000 Docutech
Database Design Consultant
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Responsible for the database design phase of an online mortgage processing system.
1988-1989 New Mexico Junior College
Seminar Designer and Instructor
  • Responsibilities Expand section.
    • Coordinated and presented seminars for area banking institutions and insurance firms on various productivity software packages.

Professional Experience [chronological]

2013-present Idaho State University
College of Business / College of Science and Engineering
Chair and Professor of Informatics and Computer Science
2012-2013 Idaho State University
College of Business
Chair and Professor of Computer Information Systems
2010-2012 Idaho State University
College of Business
Professor of Computer Information Systems
2007 (sabbatical) Curtin University of Technology
School of Information Systems
Research Fellow and Visiting Professor of Information Systems
2007 (sabbatical) RMIT University
School of Business Information Technology
Contractor Consultant of Business Information Technology
2004-2005 Idaho State University
College of Business
Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems
1999-2004 Idaho State University
College of Business
Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems
1995-1999 Saint Louis University
School of Business and Administration
Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems
1990-1991 Texas Tech University
College of Engineering
Research Assistant
1985-1989 New Mexico Junior College
Division of Business and Technology
Instructor
1984 New Mexico Junior College
Division of Business and Technology
Adjunct Computer Science Instructor
1984 University of the Southwest
Department of Business Administration
Adjunct Computer Science Instructor
1983-1984 Conoco, Inc.
Systems Group: Hobbs Division
Programmer/Analyst
1982-1983 Conoco, Inc.
Systems Group: Hobbs Division
Programmer
1981 Conoco, Inc.
Systems Group: Hobbs Division
Systems Assistant
1980 New Mexico Junior College
Division of Business and Technology
Assistant Operator/Programmer

Career Timeline

1979 Enrolled at the University of Texas at Austin. UT logo.
1982

Received Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin in May.

UT logo.
1982

Began working for Conoco, Inc. as a Programmer/Analyst in June.

Conoco logo.
1984 Accepted part-time teaching positions, teaching Pascal programming, at both New Mexico Junior College and the University of the Southwest in January. NMJC logo.
1985 Resigned from Conoco, Inc., and accepted full-time teaching position as Instructor of Computer Science at New Mexico Junior College in January. NMJC logo.
1989 Resigned from NMJC in August to pursue Masters in Computer Science in the Texas Tech College of Engineering. TTU logo.
1991 Received Master of Science in Computer Science from Texas Tech University in December. TTU logo.
1992 Enrolled in the PhD program in Management Information Systems in the Texas Tech College of Business in January. TTU logo.
1995

Received Doctor of Philosophy in Management Information Systems from Texas Tech University in May.

TTU logo.
1995

Accepted appointment as Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems at Saint Louis University in August.

SLU logo.
1999 Resigned from Saint Louis University in June and accepted an appointment as Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems at Idaho State University in July. ISU logo.
2004 Promoted to Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems at Idaho State University. ISU logo.
2005 Promoted to Full Professor of Computer Information Systems at Idaho State University. ISU logo.
2007 Visiting Academic in the School of Business Information Technology at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia (Research sabbatical – February-March). RMIT logo.
2007 Research Fellowship in the School of Information Systems at Curtin University of Technology in Perth, Australia (Research sabbatical – March-April) Curtin logo.
2010 Received a joint appointment to the ISU Computer Science faculty. ISU logo.
2012 Became Chair of the Computer Information Systems Department. ISU logo.
2013 Became Chair of the Informatics and Computer Science Department. ISU logo.

Education

Doctor of Philosophy
Texas Tech University (College of Business Administration)
1995
Major Field: Management Information Systems
Supporting Field: Computer Science
Dissertation: A Holistic Profile for Information Filtering Systems


Master of Science
Texas Tech University (College of Engineering)
1991
Major Field: Computer Science
Thesis: A Generic Life-Cycle Cost Model for an Embedded Controller


Bachelor of Arts University of Texas at Austin (College of Natural Sciences)
1982
Major Field: Computer Science

Training

Demonstrating Institutional Effectiveness (workshop led by Dr. Michael F. Middaugh)
2013

American Council on Education (ACE) Leadership Academy for Department Chairs
2012

Georgia State University Master Teacher Program
1995

Research Interests

My research record shows a tightly focused, ongoing exploration of the skills and knowledge that information technology graduates need and how they can be best prepared to obtain it.

That research falls into three major streams. The following sections briefly describe each research stream, accompanied by a list of publications associated with each.

  • Stream 1: Improved Teaching of Core IT Courses Expand section.

    This stream focuses on the integrated IS support of teaching.

    It includes the development of teaching cases and projects, IT-enhanced teaching approaches including virtual teaching assistants and online support for courses, the applications of Web 2.0 and social media in education, teaching techniques and content selection for IT courses, and alternative instructional strategies in an IS/IT curriculum.

    • Category 1 – Teaching Tools (Cases, Projects, etc.) Expand section.

      Most of the papers in this section began as course projects, and were eventually published as a means of sharing my teaching materials.

      The campus event app study details a class project used by Dr. Chao to explore augmented reality.

      The reference list formatter was designed as a project for an object-oriented development course, and has been tested in courses using Java, VB.Net, and C#.

      The remaining three teaching cases were developed for use in my database courses. They were designed to capture students' interest through their unusual setting and details.

      • Lu, Y., Chao, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2015). HUNT: Scavenger Hunt with augmented reality. Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management, 10.
      • Chao, J. C., Pan, L., & Parker, K. R. (2014). Campus event app – New exploration for mobile augmented reality. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 11, 1-11.
      • Parker, K. R. (2010). The reference list formatter: An object-oriented development project. Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management, 5, 23-48.
      • Parker, K. R., Davis, T., & Ward, D. M. (2007). Herbicide damage tracking system: An IS case study. Proceedings of the North American Case Research Association, 21 (10), Keystone, CO: October 18-20 (p. 58).
      • Parker, K. R. (2005). Lost River Wind Riders: A project for teaching database design. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 16 (24), 475-494.
      • Parker, K. R. (2003). A database design case: Teton Whitewater Kayak. Journal of Information Systems Education (Special Issue on IS Teaching Cases), 14 (3), 271-274.
    • Category 2 – IT-Enhanced Teaching Approaches Expand section.

      This category could also be called "IT-Enhanced Delivery" in order to differentiate it from "IT-Enhanced Content" below.

      The focus of the papers in this category is on the use of IT to improve teaching. The first three papers are about the use of animated pedagogical agents in teaching. The remaining papers focus on online lecture materials and interactive learning.

      • Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2011). Applied learning with the virtual teaching assistant. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Detroit, MI: August 4-7.
      • Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2010). Technology in education: An agile systems approach. Proceedings of 2010 Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Cassino, Italy: June 21-24 (pp. 297-306).
      • Bezik, M. H., Smith, K., & Parker, K. R. (2005). SPUD's – A computer-assisted interactive project for use in intermediate accounting courses. 2005 Western Region American Accounting Association Meeting, Sacramento, CA: April 29-30.
      • Parker, K. R. (2002). Using and enhancing online lecture materials. Mountain Plains Journal of Business and Economics, 3.
      • Parker, K. R. (2001). Techniques to enhance online lecture materials. Proceedings of the 2001 Mountain Plains Management Conference, Pocatello, ID: October 17-19.
      • Aytes, K., & Parker, K. R. (2001). Using the web to create a dynamic, interactive learning environment. Proceedings of the 2001 Mountain Plains Management Conference, Pocatello, ID: October 17-19.
    • Category 3 – Applications of Web 2.0 and Social Media in Education Expand section.

      The papers in this category deal with the use of social media to enhance teaching. It is a more specific branch of the previous category. The latest paper attempts to involve several types of social media in teaching, including chat, Twitter, Facebook, and wikis. The other two papers focus exclusively on wikis, the first on wikis in general and the second on wiki use in education.

      • Chao, J. C., Parker, K. R., & Fontana, A. (2011). Developing an Interactive Social Media Based Learning Environment. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 8, 323-334.
      • Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. (2008). Weaving a knowledge web with wikis. In M. D. Lytras, R. D. Tennyson, & P. Ordóñez de Pablos (Eds.), Knowledge Networks: The Social Software Perspective (pp. 28-45). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
      • Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. (2007). Wiki as a teaching tool. Interdisciplinary Journal of Knowledge and Learning Objects, 3, 57-72.
    • Category 4 – Enhanced IT Course Content Expand section.

      The papers in this category seem diverse, but all relate to the design of curriculum or course content.

      The first and second papers identify a range of problems encountered in group projects and present several promising solutions.

      The third paper considers the value of requiring computer science majors to take a systems analysis and design course, even in lieu of a software engineering course, because many CS graduates enter the workforce designing business application software. This approach not only provides knowledge of software development techniques, but also exposure to concepts like business rules, varied stakeholders, and business requirements elicitation.

      The fifth paper explores the use of frameworks in teaching software development, and how to make the most appropriate selection.

      The fourth paper presents an Information Technology Pedagogical Knowledge framework intended to facilitate the design and development of IT-related curriculum.

      The sixth and last papers discuss the content of information technology hardware and systems software courses.

      The seventh paper presents an instructional method for validating a relational database design.

      • Houghton, R.F., Parker, K.R., Davey, B., & Bozan, K. (2017). Approaches for Addressing Student Barriers to Collaborative Learning Success. In J.S. Keengwe (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Mobile Technology, Constructivism, and Meaningful Learning (pp. 23-43). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.
      • Davey, B., Bozan, K., Houghton, R., & Parker, K.R. (2016). Alternatives for pragmatic responses to group work problems. Informing Science: the International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline, 19 89-102.
      • Beard, D.V., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T.A., Davey, W.F., & Schou, C.D. (2013). Requiring a systems analysis and design course for a computer science major. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Frontiers in Education: Computer Science & Computer Engineering (FECS 2013), Las Vegas, Nevada: July 22-25 (pp. 257-262).
      • Chao, J. C., Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2013). Navigating the framework jungle for teaching web application development. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 10, 95-109.
      • Chin, K. L., Chang, E., Atkinson, D., & Parker, K. R. (2007). Ontology-based IT pedagogical knowledge framework. Proceedings of the 2007 Computer Science and Information Technology Education Conference, Mauritius: November 16-18 (pp. 155-166).
      • Beachboard, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Understanding information technology: What do graduates from business-oriented IS curricula need to know? Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 2, 219-236.
      • Parker, K. R. (2004). A data model validation approach for relational database design courses. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 1, 813-825.
      • Beachboard, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2003). How much is enough? Teaching information technology in a business-oriented IS curriculum. Proceedings of the 2003 Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2003), Tampa, FL: August 4-6 (pp. 3026-3031).
    • Category 5 – Alternative Instructional Strategies Expand section.

      This category is closely related to the previous category, but focuses exclusively on using a model from accounting literature, the Resources-Events-Agents (REA) model, in conjunction with traditional Systems Analysis and Design modeling approaches.

      • Parker, K. R., LeRouge, C., & Trimmer, K. (2005). Alternative instructional strategies in an IS curriculum. Journal of Information Technology Education, 4, 43-60.
      • Parker, K. R., Trimmer, K., & LeRouge, C. (2005). The REA ontology to supplement teaching data flow diagrams. Proceedings of the 2005 Americas Conference on Information Systems: Ontological Analysis in Systems Analysis and Design Track, Omaha, NE: August 11-14 (pp. 2793-2801).
      • Parker, K. R., Trimmer, K., & LeRouge, C. (2005). The correspondence between the REA ontology and data flow diagrams. 2005 Western Region American Accounting Association Meeting, Sacramento, CA: April 29-30.
      • Trimmer, K., & Parker, K. R. (2004). Revising instructional strategies in systems analysis and design. Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on Informatics Education Research, Washington, DC: December 10-12 (pp. 175-182).
    • Category 6 – Computing Education Trends Expand section.

      This sub-stream focuses on computing education trends, including the use of historical trends to anticipate what we should be teaching today. In each of the papers we see that a historical perspective can be used to identify new issues to be considered by curriculum planners.

      • Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2014). Computers in schools in the USA: A social history. A. Tatnall & B. Davey (Eds.), Reflections on the History of Computers in Education: Early Use of Computers and Teaching about Computing in Schools  (pp. 203-211). Boston, MA: Springer.
      • Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2012). The history of computer language selection. In A. Tatnall (Ed.), Reflections on the History of Computing: Preserving Memories and Sharing Stories (pp. 166-179). Boston, MA: Springer.
      • Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2010). Turning points in computer education. In A. Tatnall (Ed.) IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Vol. 325 History of Computing: Learning from the Past (pp. 159-168). Boston, MA: Springer.
      • Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Davey, B. (2008). History of computing education trends: The emergence of competitive intelligence. In J. Impagliazzo (Ed.) IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Vol. 269 History of Computing and Education 3 (pp. 113-127). Boston, MA: Springer.
      • Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2006). Language history – A tale of two countries. In J. Impagliazzo (Ed.), IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Vol. 215 History of Computing and Education 2 (pp. 139-151). Boston, MA: Springer.
  • Stream 2: Impact of Developments in Information Systems on Curriculum Expand section.

    This stream includes software and programming language selection in light of industry trends and learning needs, as well as information assurance in systems analysis and design.

    The focus of this research is to insure that both programming languages and software tools prepare IS/IT graduates for the real world.

    • Category 1 – Software and Language Selection Expand section.

      The papers in this category propose criteria for the selection of software and programming languages for IS or IT curricula in light of industry trends and learning needs. The sub-stream started with a focus on the selection of programming languages for introductory programming courses, and later expanded to cover the evaluation and selection of software tools for use in an IS or IT curriculum. The latest paper, still under revision, investigates whether PHP-based web development courses should use PHP frameworks to guide program development and how to select an appropriate framework. The purpose of this sub-stream is not only to facilitate curriculum and course development, but also to insure that students are given the opportunity to use the most appropriate tools and languages.

      • Parker, K. R. (2010). Selecting software tools for IS/IT curricula. Education and Information Technologies (Special Issue on Information Systems Curriculum), 15 (4), 255-275.
      • Parker, K. R., Chao, J. T., Ottaway, T. A., & Chang, J. (2006). A formal language selection process for introductory programming courses. Journal of Information Technology Education, 5, 133-151.
      • Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Chao, J. T. (2006). Criteria for the selection of a programming language for introductory courses. International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, 2 (1/2), 119-139.
      • Ottaway, T. A., Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. T. (2006). The selection of a language for introductory programming courses: An exploratory survey. Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Western Decision Sciences Institute, Waikoloa, HI: April 11-15 (pp. 270-272).
    • Category 2 – Advances in Analysis & Design Expand section.

      Requirements elicitation and information assurance are critical parts of system development. This category includes papers that examine ways in which requirements elicitation can be improved, and other papers that propose an approach for enforcing secure design by using the Reference Monitor concept during the early stages of early stages of systems requirements specification.

      • Davey, Bill, & Parker, K. R. (2015). Requirements elicitation problems: A literature analysis. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 12, 71-82.
      • Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2014). A classification of requirements elicitation problems. Proceedings of the 2014 Mountain Plains Business Association Global Business Conference, Pocatello, Idaho: October 8-10.  
      • Trimmer, K., Parker, K. R., & Schou, C. (2009). Functional requirements for secure code: The reference monitor and use case. Academy of Information and Management Sciences Journal, 12 (2), 113-119.
      • Trimmer, K., Parker, K. R., & Schou, C. (2008). Functional requirements: The reference monitor and use case. Proceedings of the Academy of Information and Management Sciences, Reno, NV: October 15-17 (p. 264).
      • Trimmer, K., Parker, K. R., & Schou, C. (2007). Enforcing early implementation of information assurance precepts throughout the design phase. Journal of Informatics Education Research, 9 (1), 95-120.
      • Schou, C., Trimmer, K., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Forcing early binding of security using a design reference monitor concept in systems analysis and design courses. Proceedings of the International Conference on Informatics Education and Research, Las Vegas, NV: December 9-11 (pp. 321-331).
    • Category 3 – Health Informatics Expand section.

      Many educational institutions have recently initiated, revised, or improved their HI programs or have begun offering individual courses in that area. Those programs and courses are intended to help students gain the knowledge and develop the skills needed for designing, developing, implementing, and managing health information systems across diverse settings effectively and efficiently.

      • Parker, K.R., Srinivasan, S.S., Houghton, R.F., Kordzadeh, N., Bozan, K., Ottaway, T., & Davey, B. (2017). Health Informatics Program Design and Outcomes: Learning from an Early Offering at a Mid-Level University. Education and Information Technologies, 22, 1497–1513 (published online May 2016).
  • Stream 3: Emerging Systems Development Issues Expand section.

    This stream includes computing education trends, or using historical trends to anticipate what is coming next.

    It also includes research into emerging trends in development, like the Semantic Web.

    Finally, this stream considers common mistakes that web developers must be taught to avoid, including color inaccuracies and other accessibility issues.

    • Category 1 – Business Intelligence Expand section.

      Business intelligence, or competitive intelligence, reflects a new use of information systems in industry. Papers in this sub-stream reflect on what BI and knowledge management involve and how IS can be used to support such efforts. Graduates should be familiar with concepts like BI in order to be adequately prepared for the profession.

      • Park, J., Fables, W., Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. (2010). The role of culture in business intelligence. International Journal of Business Intelligence Research, 1(3), 1-14.
      • Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2006). Competitive intelligence gathering. In D. G. Schwartz (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management (pp. 44-50). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
      • Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2005). Improving competitive intelligence for knowledge management systems. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management – Special Issue on Business Intelligence for Competitive Advantages, 3 (1), 24-45.
      • Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Integrating knowledge management and competitive intelligence into both the retailing and services businesses. Proceedings of the 12th International EIRASS Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Services Science, Orlando, FL: July 21-24.
      • Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2003). Library science, knowledge management, competitive intelligence: Archive theory the common link. The Reference Librarian, 38 (79/80), 395-407.
      • Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., & Dishman, P.L. (2003). Multi-class interest profile applications in the intelligence process. Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 21 (5), 263-271.
      • Saxby, C.L., Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Dishman, P.L. (2002). Environmental scanning and organizational culture. Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 20 (1), 28-34.
      • Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2001). Improving competitive intelligence gathering for knowledge management systems. Proceedings of The 2001 International Symposium on Information Systems and Engineering (ISE'2001-Workshop: Knowledge Management Systems: Concepts, Technologies and Applications), Las Vegas, NV: June 25-28 (pp. 122-128).
      • Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2000). A multi-class interest profile (M-CLIP) for online competitive intelligence systems. Proceedings of the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP) Academic Conference on Competitive Intelligence: Curriculum and Research, Philadelphia, PA: December 8.
    • Category 2 – Semantic Web Expand section.

      This category is closely related to the preceding category, but adds the Semantic Web into the mix with BI and KM. Papers 1, 3, and 4 focus on the integration of the three approaches to build knowledge management centers, with papers 1 and 3 proposing the use of local libraries as knowledge management centers for small businesses. Paper 2 is a refereed text chapter that explains some of the technologies required to make a Semantic Web viable.

      • Parker, K. R., Williams, R. F, Nitse, P. S., & Tay, A. (2008). Use of the normalized word vector approach in document classification for an LKMC. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 5, 513-524.
      • Parker, K. R. (2006). Enabling technologies for the semantic web. In M. D. Lytras & A. Naeve (Eds.), Intelligent Learning Infrastructures for Knowledge Intensive Organizations: A Semantic Web Perspective (pp. 39-56). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
      • Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Flowers K. A. (2005). Libraries as knowledge management centers. Library Management Journal (Special Issue on Digital Libraries in the Knowledge Era: Knowledge Management and Semantic Web Technology), 26 (4/5), 176-189.
      • Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Gathering information in the digital age using the semantic web. Frontiers of e-Business Research 2005, 2, Tampere, Finland: September 26-28 (pp. 603-614).
    • Category 3 – Color Inaccuracies in eCommerce Expand section.

      This sub-stream discusses the difficulty of accurately representing colors on eCommerce sites, and the ramifications of settling for inaccurate colors, such as customer defections. This issue is one that aspiring developers must be made aware so as to not propagate the problem in future generations of eCommerce sites.

      • Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Tay, A. (2009). The impact of inaccurate color on customer retention and CRM. Informing Science: the International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline, 12, 105-112.
      • Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Krumwiede, D. W. (2004). The impact of color in the e-commerce marketing of fashions: An exploratory study. European Journal of Marketing, 38 (7/8), 898-915.
      • Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2004). Consumer perception of color depicted on e-commerce websites: An exploratory study. Proceedings of the 11th International EIRASS Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Services Science, Prague, Czechoslovakia: July 10-13.
      • Krumwiede, D., Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Ottaway, T. A. (2004). Customer sensitivity to electronically reproduced color products: Its effect on the operation of return goods. Distribution Business Management Association Annual Conference Proceedings, Chicago, IL: May 18-20 (pp. 1-9).
      • Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2004). The impact of color inaccuracies on e-commerce sites. Proceedings of The Information Technology & Global Business Research Conference, Cancun, Mexico: March 10-13 (pp. 50-56).
      • Krumwiede, D., Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., & Ottaway, T. A. (2003). Returning internet purchased color sensitive products: The effect on the supply chain. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference of the Decision Sciences Institute, Shanghai, China: July 4-8, 2003.
      • Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Krumwiede, D. W. (2002). The impact of consumer perception on e-commerce transactions. Proceedings of The International Applied Business Research Conference, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico: March 14-19.
    • Category 4 – Web Accessibility Needs Expand section.

      This nascent sub-stream concentrates on web accessibility issues, such as the reading level of the content of a web site content. The first paper in this series considers the difficulties that an aging population might encounter with a government web site. Many design courses address obvious issues like the Web Accessibility Initiative – Accessible Rich Internet Applications guidelines. However, while developers can accommodate disabled users by developing screen-reader accessible sites, and can even plan to accommodate users with color blindness, they must also be taught not to overlook less obvious barriers, like readability.

      • Davey, B., Parker, K. R. & Lukaitis, A. (2011). e-Government and the elderly: A two country comparison. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Detroit, MI: August 4-7.
      • Bozan, K., Davey, B., & Parker, K.R (2015). Social influence on health IT adoption patterns of the elderly: An institutional theory based use behavior approach. Procedia Computer Science, 63, 517-523.
      • Bozan, K., Davey, B., & Parker, K.R. (2016). A closer look at the social influence construct in the UTAUT model: An institutional theory based approach to investigate health it adoption patterns of the elderly. Proceedings of the 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-49), Koloa, Kauai, Hawaii: January 5-8 (pp. 3105-3114).
      • Bozan, K., Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2017). Social Forces that Influence Health IT Use Behavior of the Elderly. In N. Wickramasinghe (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Healthcare Administration and Management (pp. 369-383). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Published Refereed Journal Articles:

  1. Chiang, C-T, Wei, C-F, Parker, K.R., Davey, B. (2017 online). Exploring the Drivers of Customer Engagement Behaviors in Social Network Brand Communities: Toward a Customer Learning Model. Journal of Marketing Management. Authorized Link   
  2. Parker, K.R., Srinivasan, S.S., Houghton, R.F., Kordzadeh, N., Bozan, K., Ottaway, T., & Davey, B. (2017). Health Informatics Program Design and Outcomes: Learning from an Early Offering at a Mid-Level University. Education and Information Technologies, 22, 1497–1513 (published online May 2016) Authorized Link    Download
  3. Davey, B., Bozan, K., Houghton, R., & Parker, K.R. (2016). Alternatives for pragmatic responses to group work problems. Informing Science: the International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline, 19, 89-102. Authorized Link    Download
  4. Davey, Bill, & Parker, K. R. (2015). Requirements elicitation problems: A literature analysis. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 12, 71-82. Authorized Link    Download
  5. Lu, Y., Chao, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2015). HUNT: Scavenger Hunt with augmented reality. Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management, 10, 21-35. Authorized Link    Download
  6. Chao, J. C., Pan, L., & Parker, K. R. (2014). Campus event app – New exploration for mobile augmented reality. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 11, 1-11. Authorized Link    Download
  7. Chao, J. C., Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2013). Navigating the framework jungle for teaching web application development. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 10, 95-109.    Authorized Link    Download
  8. Chao, J. C., Parker, K. R., & Fontana, A. (2011). Developing an interactive social media based learning environment. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 8, 323-334.    Authorized Link    Download
  9. Park, J., Fables, W., Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2010). The role of culture in business intelligence. International Journal of Business Intelligence Research, 1 (3), 1-14.    Authorized Link    Download
  10. Parker, K. R. (2010). Selecting software tools for IS/IT curricula. Education and Information Technologies (Special Issue on Information Systems Curriculum), 15 (4), 255-275.     Authorized Link    Download
  11. Parker, K. R. (2010). The reference list formatter: An object-oriented development project. Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management, 5, 23-48.   Authorized Link   Download
  12. Trimmer, K., Parker, K. R., & Schou, C. (2009). Functional requirements for secure code: The reference monitor and use case. Academy of Information and Management Sciences Journal, 12 (2), 113-119.   Download
  13. Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Tay, A. (2009). The impact of inaccurate color on customer retention and CRM. Informing Science: the International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline, 12, 105-122.    Authorized Link   Download
  14. Parker, K. R., Williams, R. F., Nitse, P. S., & Tay, A. (2008). Use of the normalized word vector approach in document classification for an LKMC. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 5, 513-524.    Authorized Link   Download
  15. Trimmer, K., Parker, K. R., & Schou, C. (2007). Enforcing early implementation of information assurance precepts throughout the design phase. Journal of Informatics Education Research, 9 (1), 95-120.   Download
  16. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2007). Bilgi yönetim merkezleri olarak kütüphaneler. (C. Aydýn, Trans.). Journal of Turkish Librarianship, 21 (1), 88-103.   Download
  17. Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. (2007). Wiki as a teaching tool. Interdisciplinary Journal of Knowledge and Learning Objects, 3, 57-72. Authorized Link  Download
  18. Parker, K. R., Chao, J. T., Ottaway, T. A., & Chang, J. (2006). A formal language selection process for introductory programming courses. Journal of Information Technology Education, 5, 133-151.   Authorized Link   Download
  19. Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Chao, J. T. (2006). Criteria for the selection of a programming language for introductory courses. International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, 2 (1/2), 119-139. Authorized Link   Download
  20. Parker, K. R. (2005). Lost River Wind Riders: A project for teaching database design. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 16 (24), 475-494.   Download
  21. Beachboard, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Understanding information technology: What do graduates from business-oriented IS curricula need to know? Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 2, 219-236.   Authorized Link   Download
  22. Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Flowers K. A. (2005). Libraries as knowledge management centers. Library Management Journal (Special Issue on Digital Libraries in the Knowledge Era: Knowledge Management and Semantic Web Technology), 26 (4/5), 176-189.   Google Books   Download
  23. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2005). Improving competitive intelligence for knowledge management systems. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management (Special Issue on Business Intelligence for Competitive Advantages), 3 (1), 24-45.   Download
  24. Parker, K. R., LeRouge, C., & Trimmer, K. (2005). Alternative instructional strategies in an IS curriculum. Journal of Information Technology Education, 4, 43-60.   Authorized Link    Download
  25. Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Krumwiede, D. W. (2004). The impact of color in the e-commerce marketing of fashions: An exploratory study. European Journal of Marketing, 38 (7/8), 898-915. (Also included in Fashion Marketing: Building The Research Agenda, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.)   Authorized Link   Download
  26. Parker, K. R. (2004). A data model validation approach for relational database design courses. Journal of Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, 1, 813-825.   Authorized Link   Download
  27. Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2003). Library science, knowledge management, competitive intelligence: Archive theory the common link. The Reference Librarian, 38 (79/80), 395-407.   Download
  28. Parker, K. R. (2003). A database design case: Teton Whitewater Kayak. Journal of Information Systems Education (Special Issue on IS Teaching Cases), 14 (3), 271-274.   Authorized Link   Download
  29. Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., & Dishman, P. L. (2003). Multi-class interest profile applications in the intelligence process. Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 21 (5), 263-271.   Authorized Link   Download
  30. Parker, K. R. (2002). Using and enhancing online lecture materials. Mountain Plains Journal of Business and Economics, 3.   Authorized Link   Download
  31. Saxby, C. L., Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Dishman, P. L. (2002). Environmental scanning and organizational culture. Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 20 (1), 28-34. (Also included in the Companion Web Site for Palmer, A. (2004). Introduction to Marketing Theory and Practice. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.)   Download

Forthcoming Refereed Journal Articles: Go to top.

Refereed Chapters:

  1. Houghton, R.F., Parker, K.R., Davey, B., & Bozan, K. (2017). Approaches for Addressing Student Barriers to Collaborative Learning Success. In J.S. Keengwe (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Mobile Technology, Constructivism, and Meaningful Learning (pp. 23-43). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Authorized Link    Download
  2. Bozan, K., Parker, K.R., & Davey, B. (2017). Social Forces that Influence Health IT Use Behavior of the Elderly. In N. Wickramasinghe (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Healthcare Administration and Management (pp. 369-383). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Authorized Link    Download
  3. Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2014). Computers in schools in the USA: A social history. A. Tatnall & B. Davey (Eds.), Reflections on the History of Computers in Education: Early Use of Computers and Teaching about Computing in Schools  (pp. 203-211). Boston, MA: Springer.    Authorized Link    Download
  4. Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2012). The history of computer language selection. In A. Tatnall (Ed.), Reflections on the History of Computing: Preserving Memories and Sharing Stories  (pp. 166-179). Boston, MA: Springer.    Authorized Link    Download
  5. Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2010). Turning points in computer education. In A. Tatnall (Ed.), IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Vol. 325 History of Computing: Learning from the Past  (pp. 159-168). Boston, MA: Springer.   Download
  6. Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. (2008). Weaving a knowledge web with wikis. In M. D. Lytras, R. D. Tennyson, & P. Ordóñez de Pablos (Eds.), Knowledge Networks: The Social Software Perspective  (pp. 28-45). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.    Google Books   Download
  7. Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Davey, B. (2008). History of computing education trends: The emergence of competitive intelligence. In J. Impagliazzo (Ed.), IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Vol. 269 History of Computing and Education 3  (pp. 113-127). Boston, MA: Springer.   Google Books  Download
  8. Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2006). Language history – A tale of two countries. In J. Impagliazzo (Ed.), IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Vol. 215 History of Computing and Education 2  (pp. 139-151). Boston, MA: Springer.   Download
  9. Parker, K. R. (2006). Enabling technologies for the semantic web. In M. D. Lytras, & A. Naeve (Eds.), Intelligent Learning Infrastructures for Knowledge Intensive Organizations: A Semantic Web Perspective  (pp. 39-56). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.   Download
  10. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2006). Competitive intelligence gathering. In Schwartz, D.G. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management  (pp. 44-50). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.   Download

Authorized Republications:

  1. Park, J., Fables, W., Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2012). The role of culture in business intelligence. In R. Herschel (Ed.), Organizational Applications of Business Intelligence Management: Emerging Trends (pp. 38-51). Hershey, PA: Business Science Reference.
  2. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2011). Competitive intelligence gathering. In D. Schwartz, & D. Te'eni (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management, Second Edition (pp. 103-111). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
  3. Park, J., Fables, W., Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2011). The role of culture in business intelligence. In Information Resources Management Association (Ed.), Global Business: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications (pp. 1933-1947). Hershey, PA: Business Science Reference.
  4. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2008). Competitive intelligence gathering. In M. Jennex (Ed.), Knowledge Management: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications (pp. 3221-3229). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
  5. Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Krumwiede, D. W. (2004). The impact of color in the e-commerce marketing of fashions: An exploratory study. In A. M. Doherty (Ed.), Fashion Marketing: Building the Research Agenda (pp. 898-915). Bradford, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Refereed Proceedings:

  1. Bozan, K., Parker, K.R., & Davey, B. (2016). A closer look at the social influence construct in the UTAUT model: An institutional theory based approach to investigate health it adoption patterns of the elderly. Proceedings of the 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-49), Koloa, Kauai, Hawaii: January 5-8 (pp. 3105-3114). Authorized Link   Download
  2. Bozan, K., Davey, B., & Parker, K.R (2015). Social influence on health IT adoption patterns of the elderly: An institutional theory based use behavior approach. Procedia Computer Science, 63, 517-523. Authorized Link   Download
  3. Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2014). A classification of requirements elicitation problems. Proceedings of the 2014 Mountain Plains Business Association Global Business Conference, Pocatello, Idaho: October 8-10.  Download
  4. Beard, D.V., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T.A., Davey, W.F., & Schou, C.D. (2013). Requiring a systems analysis and design course for a computer science major. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Frontiers in Education: Computer Science & Computer Engineering, FECS 2013, Las Vegas, Nevada: July 22-25 (pp. 257-262).   Authorized Link    Download
  5. Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2011). Applied learning with the virtual teaching assistant. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Detroit, Michigan: August 4-7 (pp. 188-201).  Authorized Link   Download
  6. Davey, B., Parker, K. R., & Lukaitis, A. (2011). e-Government and the elderly: A two country comparison. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Detroit, Michigan: August 4-7 (pp. 1502-1510).   Authorized Link   Download
  7. Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2010). Technology in education: An agile systems approach. Proceedings of 2010 Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Cassino, Italy: June 21-24 (pp. 297-306).   Authorized Link   Download
  8. Trimmer, K., Parker, K. R., & Schou, C. (2008). Functional requirements: The reference monitor and use case. Proceedings of the Academy of Information and Management Sciences, Reno, Nevada: October 15-17 (p. 264).   Authorized Link   Download
  9. Chin, K. L., Chang, E., Atkinson, D., & Parker, K. R. (2007). Ontology-based IT pedagogical knowledge framework. Proceedings of the 2007 Computer Science and Information Technology Education Conference, Mauritius: November 16-18 (pp. 155-166).   Authorized Link   Download
  10. Parker, K. R., Davis, T., & Ward, D. M. (2007). Herbicide damage tracking system: An IS case study. Proceedings of the North American Case Research Association, 21 (10), Keystone, Colorado: October 18-20 (p. 58).   Download
  11. Trimmer, K., Parker, K., & Creelman, J. (2006). Lessons learned in a collaborative development project – documentation for physical therapy education. Proceedings of the International Conference on Informatics Education Research, Milwaukee, WI: December 9-10 (pp. 320-336).   Download
  12. Ottaway, T. A., Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. T. (2006). The selection of a language for introductory programming courses: An exploratory survey. Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Western Decision Sciences Institute, Waikoloa, Hawaii: April 11-15 (pp. 270-272).   Download
  13. Schou, C., Trimmer, K., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Forcing early binding of security using a design reference monitor concept in systems analysis and design courses. Proceedings of the International Conference on Informatics Education and Research, Las Vegas, Nevada: December 9-11 (pp. 321-331).   Download
  14. Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Gathering information in the digital age using the semantic web. Frontiers of e-Business Research 2005, 2, Tampere, Finland: September 26-28 (pp. 603-614).   Authorized Link   Download
  15. Parker, K. R., Trimmer, K., & LeRouge, C. (2005). The REA ontology to supplement teaching data flow diagrams. Proceedings of the 2005 Americas Conference on Information Systems: Ontological Analysis in Systems Analysis and Design Track, Omaha, NE: August 11-14 (pp. 2793-2801).   Authorized Link   Download
  16. Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2005). Integrating knowledge management and competitive intelligence into both the retailing and services businesses. Proceedings of the 12th International EIRASS Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Services Science, Orlando, Florida: July 21-24.   Download
  17. Bezik, M. H., Smith, K., & Parker, K. R. (2005). SPUD's – A computer-assisted interactive project for use in intermediate accounting courses. 2005 Western Region American Accounting Association Meeting, Sacramento, CA: April 29-30.    Authorized Link   Download
  18. Parker, K. R., Trimmer, K., & LeRouge, C. (2005). The correspondence between the REA ontology and data flow diagrams. 2005 Western Region American Accounting Association Meeting, Sacramento, CA: April 29-30.   Download
  19. Trimmer, K., & Parker, K. R. (2004). Revising instructional strategies in systems analysis and design. Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on Informatics Education Research, Washington, DC: December 10-12 (pp. 175-182).    Download
  20. Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2004). Consumer perception of color depicted on e-commerce websites: An exploratory study. Proceedings of the 11th International EIRASS Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Services Science, Prague, Czechoslovakia: July 10-13.   Download
  21. Krumwiede, D., Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Ottaway, T. A. (2004). Customer sensitivity to electronically reproduced color products: Its effect on the operation of return goods. Distribution Business Management Association Annual Conference Proceedings, Chicago, Illinois: May 18-20 (pp. 1-9).   Download
  22. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2004). The impact of color inaccuracies on e-commerce sites. Proceedings of The Information Technology & Global Business Research Conference, Cancun, Mexico: March 10-13 (pp. 50-56).   Download
  23. Beachboard, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2003). How much is enough? Teaching information technology in a business-oriented IS curriculum. Proceedings of the 2003 Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2003), Tampa, FL: August 4-6 (pp. 3026-3031). Nominated for Best Paper Award.   Authorized Link   Download
  24. Krumwiede, D., Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., & Ottaway, T. A. (2003). Returning internet purchased color sensitive products: The effect on the supply chain. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference of the Decision Sciences Institute, Shanghai, China: July 4-8, 2003.   Download
  25. Ottaway, T. A., & Parker, K. R. (2002). A conceptual model of structural adaptation in agent-based workflow management systems. Proceedings of the 2002 Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2002), Dallas, Texas: August 9-11 (pp. 1476-1483). Download
  26. Nitse, P. S., Parker, K. R., Ottaway, T. A., & Krumwiede, D.W. (2002). The impact of consumer perception on e-commerce transactions. Proceedings of the International Applied Business Research Conference, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico: March 14-19.   Download
  27. Parker, K. R. (2001). Techniques to enhance online lecture materials. Proceedings of the 2001 Mountain Plains Management Conference, Pocatello, Idaho: October 17-19.   Download
  28. Aytes, K., & Parker, K. R. (2001). Using the web to create a dynamic, interactive learning environment. Proceedings of the 2001 Mountain Plains Management Conference, Pocatello, Idaho: October 17-19.   Download
  29. LeBlanc, R., & Parker, K. R. (2001). A customer-based framework for understanding e-commerce relationships. Proceedings of the International Business & Economics Research Conference 2001, Reno, Nevada: October 8-12. Received Best Paper Award.   Download
  30. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2001). Improving competitive intelligence gathering for knowledge management systems. Proceedings of The 2001 International Symposium on Information Systems and Engineering (ISE'2001-Workshop: Knowledge Management Systems: Concepts, Technologies and Applications), Las Vegas, Nevada: June 25-28 (pp. 122-128).   Download
  31. Parker, K. R., & Nitse, P. S. (2000). A multi-class interest profile (M-CLIP) for online competitive intelligence systems. Proceedings of the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP) Academic Conference on Competitive Intelligence: Curriculum and Research, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: December 8.   Download

Forthcoming Proceedings: Go to top.

Presentations:

  1. Parker, K. R., & Davey, B. (2011, August). Applied learning with the virtual teaching assistant. Paper presented at the Seventeenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Detroit, Michigan.
  2. Davey, B., Parker, K. R., & Lukaitis, A. (2011, August). e-Government and the elderly: A two country comparison. Paper presented at the Seventeenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Detroit, Michigan.
  3. Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2010, September). Turning points in computer education. Paper presented at the IFIP 4rd World Conference on the History of Computing and Education (21th IFIP World Computer Congress), Brisbane, Australia.
  4. Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2010, June). Technology in education: An agile systems approach. Paper presented at the 2010 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Cassino, Italy.
  5. Parker, K. R. (2010, June). The reference list formatter: An object-oriented development project. Paper presented at the 2010 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Cassino, Italy.
  6. Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Tay, A. (2009, June). The impact of inaccurate color on customer retention and CRM. Paper presented at the 2009 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Macon, Georgia.
  7. Parker, K. R., Nitse, P. S., & Davey, B. (2008, September). History of computing education trends: The emergence of competitive intelligence. Paper presented at the IFIP 3rd World Conference on the History of Computing and Education (20th IFIP World Computer Congress), Milan, Italy.
  8. Parker, K. R., Williams, R. F, Nitse, P. S., & Tay, A. (2008, June). Use of the normalized word vector approach in document classification for an LKMC. Paper presented at the 2008 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Varna, Bulgaria.
  9. Nitse, P. S., & Parker, K. R. (2007, November). Idaho terrorism threat assessment research center. Paper presented at the Idaho State University Research and Creative Activities Day, Pocatello, Idaho.
  10. Chin, K. L., Chang, E., Atkinson, D., & Parker, K. R. (2007, November). Ontology-based IT pedagogical knowledge framework. Paper presented at the Computer Science and Information Technology Education (CSITEd 2007) Conference, Mauritius.
  11. Parker, K. R., & Chao, J. (2007, June). Wiki as a teaching tool. Paper presented at the 2007 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
  12. Davey, B., & Parker, K. R. (2006, August). Language history – A tale of two countries. Paper presented at the IFIP 2nd World Conference on the History of Computing and Education (19th IFIP World Computer Congress), Santiago, Chile.
  13. Parker, K. R., Chao, J. T., Ottaway, T. A., & Chang, J. (2006, June). A formal process for programming language evaluation for introductory courses. Paper presented at the 2006 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Greater Manchester, UK.
  14. Bezik, M. H., Smith, K., & Parker, K. R. (2006, May). SPUD's – A computer-assisted interactive project for use in intermediate accounting courses. Paper presented at the 2006 Ohio Region American Accounting Association Meeting, Cleveland, Ohio.
  15. Bezik, M. H., Smith, K., & Parker, K. R. (2005, August). SPUDs: A skills-based, computer-assisted project for use in financial accounting courses. Paper presented at the 2005 American Accounting Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, California.
  16. Parker, K. R., LeRouge, C., & Trimmer, K. (2005, June). Alternative instructional strategies in an IS curriculum. Paper presented at the 2005 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Flagstaff, Arizona.
  17. Beachboard, J. C., & Parker, K. R. (2005, June). Determining the extent of information technology instruction in a business-oriented IS curriculum. Paper presented at the 2005 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Flagstaff, Arizona.
  18. Parker, K. R. (2004, June). A data model validation approach for relational database design courses. Paper presented at the 2004 meeting of the Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference, Rockhampton, New South Wales, Australia.

Technical Reports

  1. Parker, K. R. (1990). Requirements specification for the module level controller. Technical Report 3509-I, FSI International, Texas Tech University.
  2. Parker, K. R. (1991). Evaluation of off-the-shelf equipment meeting the requirements specification for the module level controller. Technical Report 3509-II, FSI International, Texas Tech University.

Doctoral Dissertation

  1. Parker, K. R. (1995). A holistic profile for information filtering systems. Dissertation Abstracts International, 56(5): 1567A. (UMI No. AAT 9529834). pdf

Master's Thesis

  1. Parker, K. R. (1991). A generic life-cycle cost model for an embedded controller. Unpublished master's thesis, Texas Tech University. pdf

Teaching Interests

  • Systems Analysis and Design
  • Database Management Systems
  • Object-Oriented Development
  • Programming Languages and Advanced Programming Concepts
  • Web Development
  • Emerging Technologies

Teaching Philosophy

Instructional Objectives

My objectives as a teacher are threefold: to best prepare students for the profession, to share my love of learning, and to make a difference in someone’s life. From the students’ perspective, the most important of these objectives is preparation for the profession since their goal is to gain the necessary knowledge and preparation for a job. My industry experience prior to entering academia, as well as my close ties to the local information technology (IT) community through area employers and former graduates, provide me with an awareness of what employers expect from their staff. Preparation for the profession requires the skills to pursue lifelong learning, critical and analytical thinking skills, communication skills, and the ability to use current technologies.

  • Lifelong learning is essential for anyone involved in IT because technology and tools constantly change and evolve. Thus, students must be taught how to independently learn new skills, an ability that will enable them to adapt throughout their professional lives. This ability is coveted by IT employers, who seek and treasure self-reliant employees.
  • Courses must be designed to develop and hone students’ critical and analytical thinking skills. IT students must be capable of reasoning out precise solutions to unstructured problems and clearly expressing those solutions in a form that the computer can understand.
  • Instructors must also provide students with an opportunity to improve their communication skills, since IT graduates will be required to interact with both those who authorize and those who use software and systems. Exercises requiring the development of software documentation and conceptual models help to supplement these skills.
  • Students should also be instructed in the use of current technology and practices, since this is required for entry into the profession. However, such knowledge has long-term benefit only if students are also given sufficient grounding to adapt to new technologies over time.

Instructional Methods

My philosophy involves using a variety of teaching techniques to achieve the above objectives. Concentrating on teaching best practices and concepts rather than merely focusing on the latest tool requires students to learn how to reason out the different ways of implementing those concepts as required by the wide variety of IT tools, a valuable skill that facilitates lifelong learning. Assignments should be designed to reinforce course concepts, but also to simulate as closely as possible an enterprise experience. In this way not only do students receive meaningful hands-on experience, but that experience serves as a vehicle for demonstrating and practicing basic principles.

However, students must not only learn the course concepts but must also be able to apply their learning to real job situations upon graduation, so experience with tools is essential. Therefore, I believe that courses should be heavily reliant on hands-on, interactive, goal-driven active learning and project-based learning assignments. If carefully planned, homework exercises and functional projects can reinforce core concepts while at the same time providing students with experience using the latest software tools. Both “live” projects commissioned by local companies and simulated projects based on real-world companies or scenarios can be structured to insure that students gain exposure to the complexity that they will encounter upon entering the work force. In addition, projects in advanced courses should require students to work in collaborative teams, because recruiters often express a preference for students with experience working as part of a team.

IT is a challenging field in which to teach because course content must evolve to keep pace with constant technological advances. I believe that every lecture must be meticulously researched so that the instructor knows the topic thoroughly. IT courses also require that assignment specifications are painstakingly and explicitly written to insure that students gain experience with the course topics that the assignment is intended to reinforce. Further, the assignments themselves must be implemented by the professor before they are assigned to insure that the specifications do not require something that is impossible or unreasonably hard, and to provide students with an example after which to model their solution. Three of my course projects have been deemed sufficiently challenging and detailed to merit publication in international refereed journals.

I've always believed that the most effective teachers are those who can capture and keep students’ attention. I believe that humor can be an effective tool for keeping students interested, and one student commented on a recent evaluation, “He's funny and that keeps my attention.” Enthusiastically delivered lectures also help keep student focus. Because I have a passion for teaching and sincerely value what I teach, it is natural for me to be enthusiastic in the classroom. Students notice and respond to this. One student evaluation comment noted, “His excitement for the subject matter helped me to really like it.” Actively involving students in lectures also helps to get their attention. One of my strengths as a teacher has always been my ability to develop a strong rapport with students. I enjoy interacting with students and I always learn each student’s name as quickly as possible so I can address them by name when I ask questions in class or solicit their feedback. Knowing that they may be personally called on to participate at any time keeps their attention. Students quickly come to realize that I genuinely care about them, not just as students but as individuals. When students miss consecutive class meetings I make it a practice to send them an e-mail message to check on them. Students are encouraged to provide constructive feedback about courses, and often do so because they know that I listen and want to improve my courses. I encourage students to ask questions in class, during office hours, and via email. They know that I am available to them seven days a week. I also aggressively try to find internships and job opportunities for my students. For me, this one-on-one interaction with my students is essential for their learning and for my enjoyment of teaching. They generally seem to respond by working harder.

I also believe that it is important for teachers to practice what they preach. Many of my courses focus on web-based development, and I provide a wealth of online lecture notes that are designed to not only convey lecture material but to also provide examples of good practices and innovative ways to use information technology. Many of my notes include a “Try It!” section that allows students to try out lecture topics within the online notes. I have also developed tutorial software that uses animation and audio clips to demonstrate core concepts. Social media has been explored as a teaching aid both in my classes and in my research. Teachers must constantly strive to become better, and technology is just one tool that I harness.


Student Assessment

Many IT courses focus on problem-solving skills, so assignments must be designed to test students’ ability to develop solutions to unstructured problems. The more advanced the course, the more challenging the problem should be. Large projects can be divided into deliverables in order to focus on specific skills. Assignment objectives should clearly state the skills that the assignment is designed to assess and grading rubrics should be provided for every assignment or deliverable so that students know in advance exactly what is expected of them and that grading will be consistent and equitable. IT assignments can be designed such that students can easily determine if their assignments function correctly and meet assignment specifications.


Motivation for Teaching

I began by stating that I had three primary objectives as a teacher. However, I focused almost exclusively on the first of the three, perhaps because the other two are selfish. I want to share with students my love of learning. I want to make a difference in their lives. I find it fulfilling when former students write to tell me that they are making an immediate impression on their employers, and they attribute it to my teaching. I found it even more thrilling when an employee of an entrepreneurial former student wrote to thank me for making her job possible. To know that you have had a positive impact on even one individual’s life makes all the hard work and preparation worth the effort. I take my role as an educator very seriously and work to deliver the best possible teaching product I can. I believe that teaching is a sacred trust and responsibility, and I approach each course and each student with the respect, compassion, and effort that this belief merits.

My Role Models

My teaching has been shaped by many role models, whose wonderful teaching I can only try to emulate, but will never equal. I acknowledge a few of them here.

Teaching Experience

Idaho State University

  • Information Systems
  • Web Development: Essentials
  • Web Development; Client-side Programming
  • Systems Analysis and Design (undergraduate and graduate)
  • Database Design and Implementation using MySQL (undergraduate and graduate)
  • Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic
  • Advanced Business Programming using Visual Basic
  • Advanced Computer Programming using C# (Computer Science)
  • Object-Oriented Development using Java (undergraduate and graduate)
  • Web Development for eCommerce (undergraduate and graduate)
  • CS/CIS/GIS Graduate Technology Seminar
  • Special Problems in Computer Information Systems
  • Special Problems in Business Administration (MBA)

Saint Louis University

  • Systems Analysis and Design (undergraduate and graduate)
  • Database Management Systems (undergraduate and graduate)
  • Object-Oriented Programming Techniques (undergraduate and graduate)
  • Managing Information Technology – Emerging Technologies (graduate)

Curriculum Development

Idaho State University

One of my first tasks after becoming department chair was leading the effort to update our curriculum. We first transitioned the Computer Information Systems (CIS) program to Business Informatics, closely followed by converting Health Information Systems Management to Health Informatics. Both majors were redesigned to better serve both the students and employers.

The next phase undertaken by our team was the design of a Master of Science in Health Informatics curriculum. This was eventually followed by the development of a concurrent BBA and MS degree to permit students to attain both the BBA and MS in Health Informatics in five years.

Our faculty also assisted in developing a proposal for a Master of Science in Data Analytics, and a Master of Science in Computer Science.

Several years prior to becoming chair, I was instrumental in the restructuring of the undergraduate CIS curriculum, and participated in the development of a proposal for a Master’s program in CIS.

I also proposed and developed, or redesigned, dozens of courses as follows:

  • Course Redesign: INFO 3307 – Systems Analysis and Design was restructured to include classincal analysis and design techiques, object-oriented analysis and design techniques, and the anaylsis and design of web-based systems, including a glimpse of web engineering and web science (Fall 2016)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 1120 – The original CIS 1120 was split into two courses. The second component, which will remain CIS 1120, will focus on client-side programming using JavaScript and jQuery. (Fall 2012)
  • New Course: CIS 1110 – The original CIS 1120 was split into two courses. This new course delves more deeply into HTML5 and CSS3. While JavaScript and interactive pages will be introduced, those concepts are no longer the focus of the course. This new focus, and the fact that HTML5 and CSS3 will not be finalized for several years, required course materials to be developed from the ground up. (Spring 2012).
  • Course Redesign: CIS 4430 – Developed an entirely new set of course materials for the Web Development for eCommerce course. Previously the course delivery was student driven, with course topics selected by the professor, but lectures were researched and presented by the students as a means of developing student research and presentation skills. However, presentation quality had degraded over the years, necessitating a new delivery model. A set of course lectures and assignments were researched and developed by the professor. In addition, the use of MySQL and PHP to generate actual online catalog pages for fully-functioning eCommerce sites was incorporated into the course. The emphasis on web entrepreneurship was increased. (Fall 2011)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 4403 – Redesigned Systems Analysis and Design to bring course content up to date and to introduce a focus on the development of web-based information systems. Topics like agile development and cloud based computing were also added to course. All course materials, including lectures, assignments, and exams were developed from the ground up. (Fall 2011)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 4407 – Redesigned the database course so that it was based on MySQL rather than SQL Server. This was done to integrate the course more fully with CIS 4430 (Web Development for eCommerce) as part of a thrust toward web entrepreneurship. Database manipulation using PHP was also introduced in the course, as was installation and use of the LAMP or WAMP web development frameworks. Almost all new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Spring 2011)
  • Course Redesign: CS 2282 – Modified Advanced Computer Programming for the Computer Science department to expand the coverage of object-oriented concepts and to introduce the C#.Net programming language into the curriculum. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Fall 2010)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 3302 – Revised our Information Systems course to introduce the use of open source tools to teach students to develop a fully functional web site for a real or prototype business. This course is an introduction to IS for most non-majors, and students learned to appreciate the utility of IS when they develop something that they find useful and intriguing. At the same time, students see how information systems are interwoven throughout a successful business. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course.(Spring 2010)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 2220 – Redesigned the Foundations of Computer Programming course to incorporate some of object-oriented concepts that had previously been covered in CIS 3320, since CIS 3320 was removed from the list of required courses. (Fall 2008)
  • New Course: CIS 1120 (initially CIS 2299) – Designed and developed Interactive Web Development to provide students with exposure to HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, as well as to help students acquire basic programming skills. This course in effect replaced our existing introduction to programming course and was intended to use interactive web development to gently introduce both majors and non-majors to programming concepts like sequence, selection, and iteration, as well as functions, parameters, arrays, and string manipulation. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Spring 2008)
  • New Course: CIS 5591 – Developed a graduate seminar called CS/CIS Graduate Technology Seminar at the request of the GIS program for research-oriented graduates with an interest in new advances in computing technology. The seminar is based on analysis of articles from recent literature on emerging technology as well as new topics and challenges in software development, deployment, and use. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Fall 2007)
  • New Course: CIS 4407 – Developed Database Design and Implementation to replace our existing database course. This course incorporates a professional-grade multi-user relational DBMS (SQL Server) and covers advanced topics like stored procedures and triggers, advanced SQL, query optimization, and information assurance. Preprogrammed SQL using ASP.NET or VB.NET is included. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course.(Spring 2006)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 4430 – Revised our Web Development for eCommerce to incorporate emerging web development technologies like Web 2.0, HTML 4.01, AJAX, XBRL, etc., as well as topics like PHP, MySQL, and ASP.Net that are not covered in other courses. (Fall 2004)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 3382 – Revised Systems Analysis and Design to emphasize the systems development life cycle. Structured design approaches such as data flow diagrams are compared and contrasted to newer approaches associated with the unified modeling language (UML) to model systems. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. This course was later replaced by CIS 4403. (Spring 2003)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 3320 – Revised Advanced Business Programming (originally CIS 2221), to emphasize critical advanced topics, including object-oriented concepts and introductory data structures. Later course revisions de-emphasized data structures to expand coverage of OO concepts. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. A semester project using .NET was developed and refined for this course, and was eventually published in an academic journal. (Spring 2002)
  • New Course: CIS 4440 – Designed and developed Object-Oriented Programming to provide students with experience using the Java programming language and to provide thorough coverage of all object-oriented design concepts. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. This course was originally listed as CIS 4491. (Fall 2000)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 4480 – Revised Database Management Systems to more thoroughly cover basic database concepts including database design techniques such as data modeling and normalization. Students design database systems, implement them, and access them using SQL queries, forms, and reports. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. While teaching this class I developed a variety of "life-like" semester projects, two of which (Teton White Water Kayak and Lost River Wind Riders) were published in academic journals. I also formulated a data model validation approach for relational database design courses that was also published. (Fall 1999)
  • Course Redesign: CIS 2200 – Revised Foundations of Computer Programming from the ground up to increase student engagement and retention, and to use an object-based language to better teach students the basics of programming including the essential concepts of sequence, selection, and iteration, as well as procedures, arrays, and string manipulation through the use of the Visual Basic.Net programming language. Problem solving techniques and analytical thinking are also emphasized. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Fall 1999)

Saint Louis University

While at SLU, I helped to direct multiple restructurings of the undergraduate MIS curriculum, and contributed to the development of a new Master of Science in MIS program.

I also proposed and developed, or redesigned, several courses as follows:

  • New Course: MIS 345 – Collaborated on the development of Advanced Internet Technologies with an adjunct instructor. This course was designed to provide students with knowledge of the components of a web-based business/storefront and how to apply the components to an intranet or extranet, as well as the programming capability to implement such a solution. The primary infrastructure components include HTML, web serving, network programming, servlets, and Java Database Connectivity. (Fall 1998)
  • Course Redesign: MIS 320 – Revised Object-Oriented Programming to enhance OO coverage and to introduce the Java language. This course predated and anticipated industry movement to Java. Since course content changed completely, this course was developed from the ground up as an essentially new course. (Fall 1996)
  • New Course: MIS 600 – Designed and developed a new graduate course called Managing Information Technology and Emerging Technologies that explored new technologies and their potential use in and impact on business. This course provided students with a broad-based understanding of the management of information technology in order to prepare them to manage change as the technology is implemented in the organizational environment. It also made students aware of current technological issues and how they impact his or her ability to manage. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Spring 1996)
  • Course Redesisgn: MIS 410 – Revised Systems Analysis and Design to increase student engagement and to emphasize the systems development life cycle. Data flow diagrams are used to model processes. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Spring 1996)
  • Course Redesign: MIS 430 – Revised Database Management Systems to more thoroughly cover basic database concepts including database design techniques such as data modeling using entity-relationship diagrams as well as normalization. Students design database systems, implement them using Oracle, and access them using SQL queries, forms, and reports. All new course materials were researched and developed for this course. (Fall 1995)

Teaching Evaluations

Idaho State University

SEMESTER COURSE TITLE NUMBER OF
RESPONSES
COURSE
RATING
INSTR.
RATING
Spring 2017 INFO 3307
INFO 5307
Systems Analysis & Design
Intermediate Systems Analysis & Design
-- -- --
Fall 2016 INFO 3307
INFO 5307
Systems Analysis & Design
Intermediate Systems Analysis & Design
13
2
3.69
4.00
3.79
4.00
Spring 2016 -- On sabbatical... -- -- --
Fall 2015 INFO 3307 Systems Analysis & Design 25 4.28* 4.65*
Spring 2015 INFO 1110 Web Development: Essentials 9 4.22* 4.67*
Fall 2014 INFO 1110 Web Development: Essentials 13 4.77* 4.69*
Spring 2014 CIS 1110
CIS 4403/5503
Web Development: Essentials
Systems Analysis & Logical Design
28
27
4.75*
4.52*
4.68*
4.70*
Fall 2013 CIS 1110
CIS 4430/5530
Web Development: Essentials
Web Development for eCommerce
18
12
4.72*
4.42*
4.67*
4.50*
Spring 2013 CIS 1110
CIS 4407/5507
Web Development: Essentials
Database Design and Implementation
14
32
3.86
3.25
4.00
3.47
Fall 2012 CIS 1120
CIS 4403/5503
Web Development
Systems Analysis & Logical Design
34
42
3.74
3.24
3.76
3.52
Spring 2012 CIS 1120
CIS 1120
CIS 4407/5507
Web Development
Web Development
Database Design and Implementation
9
18
35
3.78
3.83
3.54
3.78
3.67
3.57
Fall 2011 CIS 4403/5503
CIS 4430/5530
Systems Analysis & Logical Design
Web Development for eCommerce
26
23
3.31
3.52
3.50
3.61
Spring 2011 CIS 1120
CIS 1120
CIS 4407/5507
Interactive Web Development
Interactive Web Development
Database Design and Implementation
20
8
19
3.60
3.88
3.42
3.55
3.50
3.58
Fall 2010 CIS 1120
CIS 1120
CIS 4430/5530
CS  2282
Interactive Web Development
Interactive Web Development
Web Development for eCommerce
Advanced Programming
16
11
18
5
3.88
3.91
3.18
1.60**
3.81
3.73
3.56
1.20**
Spring 2010 CIS 120
CIS 302
CIS 302
Interactive Web Development
Information Systems
Information Systems
24
18
24
3.67
3.56
3.77
3.58
3.22
3.50
Fall 2009 CIS 120
CIS 302
CIS 302
Interactive Web Development
Information Systems
Information Systems
21
13
9
3.33
2.85
3.00
3.24
3.38
3.56
Spring 2009 CIS 120
CIS 220
CIS 430/530
Interactive Web Development
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Web Development for eCommerce
20
7
16
3.55
2.86
3.50
3.50
3.14
3.50
Fall 2008 CIS 299
CIS 220
CIS 320
Interactive Web Development
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Advanced Programming (VB)
13
7
8
3.62
3.71
3.50
3.77
4.00
3.71
Spring 2008 CIS 299
CIS 220
CIS 320
Interactive Web Development
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Advanced Programming (VB)
13
5
8
3.38
3.80
3.75
3.50
3.80
4.00
Fall 2007 CIS 220
CIS 320
CIS 591
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Advanced Programming (VB)
CS/CIS Graduate Technology Seminar
15
3
5
3.20
3.67
3.00
3.47
3.67
3.80
Spring 2007 -- On sabbatical... -- -- --
Fall 2006 -- On sabbatical... -- -- --
Spring 2006 CIS 220
CIS 407/507
CIS 430/530
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Database Design and Implementation
Web Development for eCommerce
7
6
8
3.86
3.60
3.63
3.86
3.50
3.25
Fall 2005 CIS 220
CIS 220
CIS 491/591
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Database Design and Implementation
6
5
7
3.17
3.80
3.71
3.67
4.00
3.71
Spring 2005 CIS 430/530
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Web Development for eCommerce
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
12
17
8
4.00
3.71
3.88
3.92
4.00
4.00
Fall 2004 CIS 430/530
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Web Development for eCommerce
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
17
9
13
3.77
3.88
3.78
3.92
4.00
4.00
Spring 2004 CIS 440/540
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Object-Oriented Development w/Java
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
6
21
12
3.50
3.57
3.42
3.83
3.81
3.83
Fall 2003 CIS 320
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Advanced Programming (VB)
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
11
23
18
3.27
3.09
3.22
3.00
3.70
3.78
Spring 2003 CIS 382
CIS 382
CIS 440/540
Systems Analysis and Design
Systems Analysis and Design
Object-Oriented Development w/Java
22
19
15
3.32
3.53
3.60
3.36
3.63
3.80
Fall 2002 CIS 221
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Advanced Programming (VB)
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
7
29
8
3.43
3.48
3.75
3.86
3.71
4.00
Spring 2002 CIS 221
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Advanced Programming (VB)
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
20
24
16
3.65
3.21
3.19
3.80
3.50
3.44
Fall 2001 CIS 220
CIS 491/591
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Object-Oriented Development w/Java
16
12
3.75
3.33
3.75
3.50
Spring 2001 CIS 220
CIS 220
CIS 480/580
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Database Management Systems
20
24
27
3.70
3.46
3.64
4.00
3.50
3.80
Fall 2000 CIS 491/591
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Object-Oriented Development w/Java
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
21
17
22
3.20
3.29
3.32
3.65
3.71
3.73
Summer 2000 CIS 220 Foundations of Programming (VB) 15 3.33 3.67
Spring 2000 CIS 220
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
15
12
23
3.82
3.58
3.48
3.50
3.83
3.57
Fall 1999 CIS 220
CIS 480/580
CIS 480/580
Foundations of Programming (VB)
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems
21
14
22
3.59
3.86
3.31
3.62
3.86
3.59

Current Evaluation Scale:1 = Strongly Disagree   4 = Strongly Agree
*Intermediate Evaluation Scale: 1 = Very Poor   5 = Very Good
Old Evaluation Scale:1 = Very Poor   4 = Very Good
**CS Evaluation Scale:5 = Poor           1 = Excellent


Undergraduate Courses:

  • INFO/CIS 1110 Web Development: Essentials
  • INFO/CIS 1120 Web Development: Client-Side Programming
  • INFO 3307 Systems Analysis and Design
  • INFO 4407 Database Design and Implementation
  • CIS 1120 (also CIS 299) Interactive Web Development (original version)
  • CIS 220 Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic
  • CIS 3302 Information Systems
  • CIS 320 (formerly CIS 221) Advanced Business Programming using Visual Basic
  • CIS 382 Systems Analysis and Design
  • CIS 4403 Systems Analysis and Logical Design
  • CIS 4407 Database Design and Implementation
  • CIS 480 Database Management Systems
  • CIS 4430 Web Development for eCommerce
  • CIS 440 (formerly CIS 491) Object-Oriented Development using Java
  • CIS 492 Special Problems in Computer Information Systems
  • CS 2282 Advanced Programming

Graduate Courses:

  • INFO 5307 Intermediate Systems Analysis and Design
  • CIS 5503 Systems Analysis and Logical Design
  • CIS 5507 Database Design and Implementation
  • CIS 5530 Web Development for eCommerce
  • CIS 5540 Object-Oriented Development using Java
  • CIS 5580 Database Management Systems
  • CIS 5591 CS/CIS Graduate Technology Seminar



Saint Louis University

SEMESTER COURSE TITLE NUMBER OF
RESPONSES
COURSE
RATING
INSTR.
RATING
Spring 1999 MIS 410
MIS 430
Systems Analysis and Design
Database Management Systems
35
33
4.80
4.79
4.74
4.91
Fall 1998 MIS 320
MIS 410
MIS 580
MIS 610
Object-Oriented Programming (Java)
Systems Analysis and Design
Object-Oriented Programming (Java) [Gr]
Systems Analysis and Design [Gr]
17
37
3
11
3.44
4.54

3.66
4.92
3.82
4.68
4.67
4.92
Spring 1998 MIS 320
MIS 320
MIS 410
MIS 580
Object-Oriented Programming (Java)
Object-Oriented Programming (Java)
Systems Analysis and Design
Object-Oriented Programming (Java) [Gr]
23
14
35
6
4.22
4.64
4.26
4.66
4.48
4.85
4.47
4.83
Fall 1997 MIS 320
MIS 410
MIS 580
Object-Oriented Programming (Java)
Systems Analysis and Design
Object-Oriented Programming (Java) [Gr]
29
28
2
3.90
4.14
5.00
4.21
4.44
4.50
Spring 1997 MIS 320
MIS 410
MIS 430
Object-Oriented Programming (C++)
Systems Analysis and Design
Database Management Systems
33
56
10
4.45
3.98
4.60
4.61
4.25
4.67
Fall 1996 MIS 320
MIS 630
Object-Oriented Programming (C++)
Database Management Systems [Gr]
10
8
3.80
4.25
4.22
4.38
Spring 1996 MIS 410
MIS 600
MIS 610
Systems Analysis and Design
Managing Information Technology [Gr]
Systems Analysis and Design [Gr]
16
27
18
4.47
3.63
4.00
4.63
3.93
4.12
Fall 1995 MIS 430
MIS 630
Database Management Systems
Database Management Systems [Gr]
23
20
*
*
*
*

Evaluation Scale: 1 = Very Poor 3 = Average 5 = Very Good

* indicates deprecated evaluation scale

Undergraduate Courses:

  • MIS 320 Object-Oriented Programming using C++/Java
  • MIS 410 Systems Analysis and Design
  • MIS 430 Database Management Systems

Graduate Courses:

  • MIS 580 Object-Oriented Programming using C++/Java
  • MIS 600 Managing Information Technology: Emerging Technologies
  • MIS 610 Systems Analysis and Design
  • MIS 630 Database Management Systems

Anonymous Evaluation Comments

Fall 2016

Systems Analysis and Design

  • Prof. Parker was really helpful. He helped to understand the materials and other aspects so properly. He was available whenever we wanted.
  • The semester project was sufficiently challenging without being impossible. The professor was fair and demonstrated genuine interest in the success and well-being of the students. The course material was valuable.
  • The project, as much of a beast as it was, really did help to do something that helped to solidify that which was taught in the class.
  • I enjoyed this class and appreciate Dr. Parker as a professor. He showed that he enjoys this material and makes the class as fun as it can be while presenting topics that do not lend themselves to “fun”.

Intermediate Systems Analysis and Design

  • Dr. Parker is kind hearted person, always eager to help international students, he is a brilliant professor!!!

Spring 2016

Sabbatical

Fall 2015

Systems Analysis and Design

  • Dr. Parker is kind and generous to every student. It's a privilege to take a class with such a helpful and understanding professor.
  • Related every topic to the real world. He is spot on in doing do because I have seen these topics put to work.
  • I enjoyed the anecdotes and examples used to make the class material seem relevant and applicable outside of the classroom. I also liked his sense of humor. I liked the simple, but effective layout of the notes and the constant access we had to them.
  • He has real world experience and knows what we need to know in the real world.
  • He is a good person, and he cares about students and their future careers. I learned a lot in the courses, and now I can decide what I will do in my future.
  • Topics in class were made interesting by applying real life scenarios.
  • He is a very helpful professor. He's awesome in remembering all of the students of his class. I understand OO approaches like I never did before.
  • Very laid back, upbeat, and always makes students feel included. Very informative, emphasized really unique ways of looking at the ways systems are designed.
  • Very energetic; wants his students to succeed.

Spring 2015

Web Development: Essentials

  • He is very easy to ask questions to and takes the time to thoroughly explain any questions and material in class.
  • I feel this is an excellent course progression and that anything that would need to be covered for the next skill has been appropriately covered.
  • Very caring, happy guy and wants students to succeed, but not to a point where we didn't learn anything. Parker does a great job.
  • He is very engaged and involved with the class.

Fall 2014

Web Development: Essentials

  • Dr. Parker makes class exciting. He cares about his students' success.
  • His interest and passion of the topic matter is clearly evident.
  • He has a sense of humor, made the class fun and interesting while being an effective teacher.
  • I really appreciate the extensive notes he has prepared for this class.
  • He has a lot of knowledge and cares about international students. Overall, perfectly done for the class.
  • I like his enthusiasm and love of the subject. Though it was a lot of lecturing, he makes it fun. I think it is really a great course. Everyone should take it.

Spring 2014

Web Development: Essentials

  • He loves teaching. It is very apparent in his attitude and excitement he brings to class every day. It made learning more fun for me. It was a pleasure to learn. Dr. Parker is a champion.
  • [I liked] his instructional style in class. Class periods just flew by, but were packed with information. The class notes, including tons of resources and examples were invaluable in understanding the material. This has been the best course I have taken at ISU so far and I can’t think of anything to improve it.
  • He can explain complicated topics in simple terms; lectures are always entertaining.
  • He is a great instructor. I wish there were 100 like him. I’m a senior; he is one of the best professors I’ve had!!!
  • He is detailed and explains new concepts well. He is clear about expectations and very reasonable about workload and due dates. This was a great class. Professor is awesome, one of the best at ISU for sure.
  • He enjoys what he is doing and has put some serious effort into the class. It would be hard to improve upon it. It’s a great class.
  • He is very good at lecturing. Made everything very interesting. He is exceedingly patient with the students. Always available thru email, responds quick. Also, funny. I loved the problem solving aspect of the assignments.
  • [I liked] his enthusiasm toward teaching. You can tell that he genuinely care about his students’ well-being.
  • Very outgoing and spunky! He really cares about the students and has put so much effort into his classes. I definitely recommend Dr. Parker! Awesome! Fun class.
  • Kevin Parker is a great instructor. He knows all the material and is great at teaching it with a sense of humor.

Systems Analysis and Logical Design

  • He really seems to take an interest in students’ well-being and career goals. Certainly seems to love his job, which is essential for a good teacher. He also makes the content seem easy.
  • He had a positive attitude toward what he is teaching, plus years of experience leads to great advice. I felt I got a lot out of this course, especially compared to others.
  • He was able to tie concepts from class to situations in the workforce. The concepts were taught for a reason; demonstrated workplace applicability.
  • Dr. Parker is always approachable, easily reached, and demonstrates that he genuinely cares about his students and their success. Dr. Parker is great.
  • He has a good teaching method. His own examples really help. It was entertaining and enjoyable.
  • Made every possible effort to be available to student questions. Introduced and covered topics not otherwise covered in previous classes.
  • [I liked] his positive attitude, friendliness about teaching. He loves his career!
  • Great attitude and a large amount of real world applications of the material.
  • Parker was very informative as well as entertaining. Keeps the attention of the class.
  • He approaches a class in a casual manner yet with firm goals and targets.

Fall 2013

Web Development: Essentials

  • He is incredibly knowledgeable, enthusiastic, and helpful toward his students. [I liked] how very helpful and willing to help outside of class Dr. Parker was. Probably the best class I’ve ever taken.
  • [I liked] his ability to keep us focused on the material during a lecture. This was accomplished by his eccentric attitude which I found to be quite refreshing.
  • He truly cares about students, and puts forth a lot of effort to help students succeed and make the class enjoyable.
  • He is personable, likable, funny, cares about subject and about students.
  • [I liked] his positive energy and great ways of explaining things.
  • He was excellent at explaining things, and he made a great deal of effort to connect with and assist the students.
  • Very knowledgeable and makes learning the subject fun; lot of energy and very enthusiastic about the course.
  • [I liked] his sense of humor and the amount of effort he puts into his teaching.
  • Did a great job to encourage and was very straightforward and helpful.

Web Development for eCommerce

  • He was so interactive and offered good guidance
  • Makes class enjoyable; knows what he is talking about; helpful
  • Open to any questions, comments, ideas, etc.
  • Very understanding, hard working; makes the class interactive and fun to be in.
  • He teaches very practically, which is really useful in real life problems.
  • I liked his positive attitude and willingness to help students. [This class] was less about tests and how well you could recall details. Instead it was about how well you could apply what you learned.

Spring 2013

Web Development: Essentials

  • Dr. Parker is always willing to help and provides many different learning tools for us to succeed.
  • The instructor was very patient. When you would go to him with any question he took it seriously and answer it. He as very interesting in class as well with the subject.
  • Very caring. Demonstrates that [he] wants students to succeed by always being available when we need to ask questions.
  • He is very enthusiastic about the course material. He is animated during his lectures which helps keep me interested. He responds to emails and questions promptly.
  • Very helpful and available through email all the time.

Database Design and Implementation

  • Keep doing what you are doing – it is a good system that works.
  • Knowledgeable. Genuinely cares about students. Great teacher, well prepared, funny.
  • [I liked] the level of detail he goes into about the subject. There is a lot to cover but he usually tries to cover more in depth.
  • [I liked] his sense of humor and his effort in helping students both in class and out of class needs.
  • [Has a] passion about subject matter, relationship with students.
  • His ability to give a real world answer to questions, even the abstract questions.
  • Dr. Parker is a very good professor. I liked his dedication to teaching.

Fall 2012

Web Development: Essentials

  • Dr. Parker is very enthusiastic and knowledgeable on the subject. His energy definitely helps keep the class fun and interesting.
  • He communicates well, gives good class notes, always willing to help.
  • It's fun to be in class. He thinks about what would be best for the students.
  • I liked his good attitude and his dedication to his students.
  • Fun, entertaining, exciting. I wanted to come to class. Parker is not boring at all, he brings his enthusiasm and energy to the class.
  • The notes for this class are fantastic.
  • He was well structured and conducted [class] at just the right pace to accommodate our learning.
  • He is funny and makes the class a fun, engaging experience.

Systems Analysis and Logical Design

  • He is very experienced in the subject matter, which is made very apparent in his teaching. He brings the information to life.
  • Dr. Parker has always been helpful and he keeps the course materials easy to understand. Definitely one of the best (awesome) professors.
  • He was very knowledgeable about the course content and he was laid back and made jokes. I liked his sense of humor. I learned quite a bit from him. I also liked the project as it gets us ready for the real world.
  • He made common sense topics, e.g., how to communicate with a user, interesting. I did not fall asleep in class.
  • [I liked] his ability to make a boring subject interesting.
  • Gets the class involved; is available to answer questions.
  • Lots of energy; enjoys teaching.
  • He's hardworking. The class is interactive. He’s not boring, he’s awesome.
  • He makes the class more enjoyable than others. He makes class fun.
  • I liked his fun, joking approach. Class was always fun.
  • Lighthearted, active in teaching, knows students names.

Spring 2012

Web Development: Essentials

  • He definitely deserves Teacher of the Year and a raise for all the hard work he puts in. Computer science is a never ending learning experience and takes serious dedication. He is the most dedicated professor on this campus.
  • His enthusiasm and obvious joy in teaching his field. He put in a lot of time researching the subject material....
  • His fun and outgoing personality. He was also very helpful inside and outside of class. He was also very accessible; I could email him and always get a response almost always immediately.
  • Easily approached and never puts anyone down.
  • He is extremely well prepared and enjoys his subject. I think this was a great course with a great teacher.
  • Dr. Parker was very concerned with the students and was completely available no matter what time or day. Dr. Parker was a great instructor.
  • I enjoyed that he honestly cared about getting to know each student by name and was actively concerned with their progress in the course.
  • Dr. Parker is the best instructor I've had. Other professors should follow his example.
  • He was very informative and animated and he made learning the material more enjoyable than it would have otherwise been.
  • His dedication and awesome teaching.
  • Very approachable, willing to go the extra mile for his students.

Database Design and Implementation

  • Theory is great and I understand you need to know a bit, but using it and getting dirty is so much better, and that's what I got!!
  • Dr. Parker makes the complicated course material easier to understand and grasp with real/actions examples. Definitely one of the best professors I ever had.
  • All around awesomeness, sense of humor, and interactiveness with students.
  • If cloning were possible, clone Parker.
  • Knows his stuff and is very helpful outside of class.
  • Dr. Parker cares about his students.
  • He's so easy going and helpful. He wants all students to learn and succeed.
  • Great notes and lectures. Teaches at a higher level than any other instructor.
  • Very helpful and enjoyable teaching style.
  • Parker has a good attitude and makes classes informative and fun.
  • He is really fun and makes class and coursework interesting and enjoyable.
  • He's fun, he makes the class lively, he makes sure no one falls asleep! He's very hard working.
  • His ability to teach a wide range of students – kids who already know a lot and others who know nothing.
  • Ability to make super boring class lectures fun!
  • Gave lots of examples/analogies that help with the concepts being taught.
  • Kept me awake (after lunch). In other words, good voice projection, mix of humor and anecdotes.
  • Dr. Parker makes learning enjoyable with his examples, and the fact that he enjoys teaching.

Fall 2011

Systems Analysis and Logical Design

  • Hardworking, cooperative, friendly, and always ready to help his students. As I am an international student I had a hard time understanding languages in class notes and exam questions. Dr. Parker has always found a best way to explain it to me. I personally take him as best teacher in ISU.
  • He made learning fun. Tried to find new/better ways to teach.
  • He obviously put a lot of effort into preparing for lectures.
  • Class has meaningful discussions. Very willing to help inside and outside of class.
  • Dr. Parker is a very caring instructor. This class would be very boring if Dr. Parker was not teaching it.
  • He is really helpful, inside and outside the class, and personally cares about everyone in the class.
  • He is a very helpful professor and he tries his best to help out the students with anything possible. I really enjoyed his class. Very nice professor.
  • Genuinely interested in topic, and also in students' understanding of the topic.
  • He has a lot of experience and can describe theoretical stuff with a lot of examples from his former work.

Web Development for eCommerce

  • Parker always goes the extra mile for his students. He is willing to make time for office hours and to meet with you when problems arise. His class notes are amazing and you can tell he takes a lot of time to prepare for lectures. This is one of the unique things that sets him apart from other faculty.
  • Dr. Parker takes pains to help the students understand how everything happens or comes together in real world.
  • Subject matter expert, brought real-world examples and experience to the classroom.
  • He's funny and that keeps my attention.
  • Truly cares about students.
  • Able to convey topics in an understandable way.
  • He is really helpful and cares about each student.
  • Excitement about material, willingness to help and teach.
  • His willingness to bend over backwards to help you accomplish homework.
  • Very animated, lighthearted, cares about the students, and remembers names.
  • Dr. Parker is very approachable and definitely wants his students to succeed.

Spring 2011

Interactive Web Development

  • Professor Parker is passionate about life. This passion is infectious.
  • Went the extra mile to help students understand what was being taught.
  • Dr. Parker has a great sense of humor and is excellent at explaining principles of programming.
  • Helpful, kind, and happy. Easy to get ahold of and quick responses.
  • Information was delivered with many helpful examples.
  • - section 2 -
  • Dr. Parker was always available for help. Dr. Parker cares about how his students are performing and tries to help if struggling. Best instructor I have had.
  • Great sense of humor, very personable, genuinely cared about the students, was available – literally all hours of the day through email etc. Out of all the zillion classes I've taken, by far one of the best teachers I've ever had.
  • Professor Parker is willing to go out of his way for students that ask for help.
  • Very helpful and approachable. Went way out of his way to help students understand material.
  • So helpful and understanding. Cares about our learning. Funny and charismatic, knowledgeable.
  • His sense of humor really made the class more enjoyable.
  • He is very funny. I like how fun he makes the class. I also like that he is prompt with responding to emails. He is always available.
  • He was very knowledgeable and interested in what he taught. He was also honest and upfront about the amount of work involved.

Database Design and Implementation

  • Dr. Parker really knows his stuff. He has worked in the real world. It shows. Also his class preparation is in a league of its own. His notes are fantastic.
  • His background and experience lend a lot to learning the material, He also puts a lot of effort into his notes and teaching.
  • Real-world experience and examples of how this is used by real companies in the workplace.
  • He is really knowledgeable in teaching this class and he really works hard.
  • Parker is very quick to respond to questions and he cares about his students.

Fall 2010

Interactive Web Development

  • Parker is the best professor ever!
  • Just an amazing guy and instructor.
  • Made class fun and interesting; very willing to help in any way possible.
  • He put a lot of effort into course materials and cared about how students did in the class.
  • Super available all the time to answer questions and offer help.
  • He has a great teaching method and really puts in the extra time to prepare examples and notes for our class.
  • I learned a lot from the online lecture notes.
  • He taught well, and kept the class interesting by joking and having fun.
  • I really felt free to ask him questions, and he helped me a lot.
  • Lots of fun, kept interest up.
  • Answers questions in a way that points us in the right direction, yet doesn't just tell us the answer directly, allowing us to think.
  • He always finds the best way to describe things to students. He is very friendly and always well prepared in his classes.
  • Notes are online and he is always willing to help further understand the material.
  • - section 2 -
  • Very helpful – helps students understand material – keeps discussion on topic but light enough to be comfortable for everyone.
  • [I liked] the amount of time spent preparing and the availability of the information.
  • Great lectures!
  • He was extremely interactive; he was extremely fair in grading.
  • Dr. Parker is a very good instructor. He explains well and helps students when they have problems with the topic taught or the assignment problems.
  • He enjoys what he does!

Web Development for eCommerce

  • What's not to like?
  • Such a great professor.
  • Innovative way of teaching.
  • Has a fun learning environment and relaxed atmosphere; easily approachable; one of the few instructors that truly has students' best interest in mind.
  • Helpful and promoted a good learning experience.
  • Parker always has a positive attitude.
  • Really helpful teacher and always available when you need help.
  • Friendly, energetic, caring about students.
  • Good approach to teaching.
  • Great organization skills; keeps the course well organized.

Advanced Programming (CS)

  • no comments collected...

Spring 2010

Interactive Web Development

  • Dr. Parker obviously has a passion for the subject and is very enthusiastic and fun during lectures while still being informative.
  • All course work, i.e., assignments, quizzes, and exams were designed not only to assess competence, but provided opportunities for learning.
  • Fun and gave great examples and always willing to help.
  • Very accessible! He was the most approachable and helpful professor I've ever had. Not only did he encourage questions, he almost expected them.
  • I really appreciate his passion for teaching and desire to help everyone succeed.
  • I liked how Parker was laid back and made class enjoyable. Very willing to help...
  • Good attitude/sense of humor. Taught curriculum in a way we could learn and understand. Very helpful. Makes you feel he wants you to pass.
  • His overall concern for his students and his great helpfulness.
  • He was very willing and available to give assistance.
  • The way he presented the material was very engaging.
  • Easy to talk to and get a hold of outside class.
  • Very friendly, easy to talk to / ask questions.

Information Systems

  • Parker is a teacher who cares deeply about how his students perform. Very refreshing.
  • The instructor was very friendly and knowledgeable in the area of CIS. He was helpful in answering questions.
  • He is passionate about teaching and works hard to give us real world, applicable knowledge.
  • He kept me interested in the class. It made me look forward to coming.
  • He makes sure to keep the students' attention. He is funny while making sure that the content is covered in an efficient and interactive manner.
  • He is very knowledgeable and is very willing to answer questions. Very friendly, which helps set a positive learning environment.
  • His enthusiasm and knowledge about the subject and the practical business information he taught. Helps students a lot.
  • Very outgoing. Loves what he does and always willing to help.
  • Very approachable. Never made me feel stupid for asking a stupid question.
  • I liked how he really cared about students. He listened and took into account our opinions.
  • He really cares about his students. Makes learning fun.
  • His willingness to tease and have fun with his students. He seemed to genuinely care about us.
  • He was laid back and easy to talk to and always willing to help.
  • He's understanding and explains things well.
  • He has a great sense of humor. He is always cheerful and excited to teach.
  • He is always around to help. He explains things in detail and tries to make the class as beneficial as possible.
  • Parker keeps his students engaged and learning.
  • Very funny. Had students' best interests at heart.
  • Willing to do what is best for students. Cared that they learn, and learn effective, relevant material.
  • I enjoyed his humor and how open he was to our feedback whether positive or negative. He was always available through email and was prompt at answering any questions presented.
  • I really liked his enthusiasm and excitement about the material and its usefulness.
  • His openness and understanding.
  • I liked what we learned how to do, it was very interesting and helpful to learn.

Fall 2009

Interactive Web Development

  • I think this class and the professor are both perfect!
  • His enthusiasm about the subject and his willingness to help students in and outside of class.
  • He always wants students to learn and is funny.
  • Really wants students to learn material and do well. Really interested in student feedback, always listens and tries to help everyone.
  • He was always willing to help when I was stuck on a program. He was funny.
  • He likes his job and it is easy to tell. Motivated teachers motivate students.
  • Very funny, great sense of humor. Made the learning experience enjoyable and pleasant. Regularly kept us informed via email.
  • Good sense of humor, responds to emails quickly, willingness to help after class.
  • Always willing to help even outside of class. He really cares about helping you understand the material and succeed.
  • He was helpful and took a lot of his own free time to answer questions.
  • Very in touch with his students and willing to help them learn. Very clear notes and examples.
  • He is friendly, personable, and cares about students. Nice guy. Good communication with students. Likes to help students.

Information Systems

  • Energetic, fun, made things interesting.
  • Good sense of humor. Very knowledgeable, good working experience brought into the classroom.. Didn't waste our time with "busy" projects. Relates to students well.
  • Approachable, realistic, and some cross between witty and insane!
  • He has a great sense of humor that makes class a bit more interesting.
  • Made class enjoyable and worthwhile.
  • He made class interesting and entertaining and still taught us the material.
  • He is a cool dude!
  • He understood individual students' needs and circumstances and would do his best to cater to those needs.
  • He is willing to look deeper than other instructors and remove all the crap.
  • He had a good sense of humor which made lectures more interesting.
  • Dr. Parker cares about his students and is always available.
  • Always had a good attitude and made class fun to attend.
  • Dr. Parker is enthusiastic about the subject. He is pleasant and energetic when it comes to his teaching. He is excellent with communicating expectations to students and responding to emails.
  • He was both interested in the subject matter and very available outside of class.

Spring 2009

Interactive Web Development

  • Best professor I've had. Knows the material very well, helps students, and very nice. I wish other CoB professors would learn a little from Dr. Parker.
  • Very funny - very encouraging. Challenged us but gave us all the resources needed to meet the challenge.
  • I've never learned so much from one course in one semester.
  • Down to earth; explains thoroughly.
  • I liked that he really understood what the topics in the class were about. He made the class interesting and fun. I liked that if I had a problem with an assignment he was willing to help.
  • He explained the information well and was always willing to help you.
  • I liked everything about the course.
  • He was open to help the students understand the material better.
  • Very easy to talk to and has a great sense of humor. He also makes himself available for his students at all times.
  • He was very approachable, helpful, encouraging. I have enjoyed the class because of the instructor.
  • Dr. Parker made the class fun and educational at the same time.
  • His sense of humor, willingness to help students, having notes and assignments available early, making video demos to help explain things to students, his technical knowledge, answering emails in a quick and timely manner.
  • Dr. Parker really explained thing thoroughly and was always there if you needed help.
  • He has a great sense of humor, made the lectures easier to understand with effective analogies and metaphors.

Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic

  • He is good at explaining and is fun to take class with.
  • Very useful analogies used to explain theory behind programming.
  • Very helpful with instructions and e-mailing; interactive with class members.

Web Development for eCommerce

  • Easy to talk to and always willing to help.
  • Very fun, well organized, understanding, great teacher – everything.
  • I really enjoy his enthusiasm for the topic and how much he really cares about his students.
  • He really likes working with students.
  • I liked how it touches every major subject related to eCommerce. There are a lot of thing I learned from this, and I liked the fact that the class was student driven.
  • Dr. Parker is very knowledgeable and willing to help. He also makes the class fun, which adds to the learning environment.
  • The breadth of the subject matter kept the course interesting.
  • He always makes sure that the students have the correct knowledge and his class is enjoyable.
  • This class is great and should be required for anyone that wants to do Internet programming and eCommerce. It covers so much knowledge that is necessary in an ever-growing field.

Fall 2008

Interactive Web Development

  • Dr. Parker was available if you needed help.
  • Great personality; very available; very interested in students.
  • Instructor made things that are normally very boring fun.
  • He made class fun and taught the info very well. He was very accessible and willing to help with any problems.
  • I love his sense of humor and enthusiasm for the subject.
  • He seems to be very helpful to students when needed. Takes suggestions from students.
  • His patience and understanding with the variety of student personalities in the class. He is very easy to talk with.
  • He is very understanding, helpful, and always prepared. He replies to emails very fast, and is very flexible with appointments.

Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic

  • He keeps class entertaining and cares about the students doing well.
  • Good sense of humor; easy to get along with.
  • Very understanding; communicates well with the class; makes learning fun; takes time for the students.
  • His notes rock and he is very friendly.

Advanced Business Programming using Visual Basic

  • Dr. Parker is very knowledgeable about the subject. He is an excellent teacher and used examples to tie in the concepts. He is always willing to make time for students and help however he can.
  • Concerned about the students; humorous.
  • He has a wonderful attitude toward the students and teaching. Everything is explained in plain terms as necessary.
  • He does his best to use real world analogies to assist comprehension of the concepts.
  • He is very organized, very very helpful inside and outside the class. I emailed him at 2 in the morning and he answered my questions. I think he is the best.
  • Always made learning fun, and helped challenge me to do my best work.

Spring 2008

Interactive Web Development

  • Thank you for all that you've done for me this semester between help on the programs and everything else. I really appreciate all the time you put in for each of us as individuals. It means a lot!
  • He's always accessible via email at just about any (literally) time of the day and [you] get a response back in 5 minutes.
  • He is very knowledgeable about the subject and gives a good lecture.
  • He is a friendly, enthusiastic and well prepared for the class. I appreciate him sitting in front of the computer and sending replies to our emails to solve our problems as late as 2 am.
  • Friendly, eager to help out with any questions, gives good examples. Takes time for students. Hilarious!!! My favorite professor I've ever had.
  • It is something I've never done before, so this is a completely new experience. I have learned so much with the way it has been presented and feel more prepared for CIS 220.
  • Very good notes. Funny and helpful.
  • Willing to work with students.
  • His enthusiasm for teaching the material.

Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic

  • Humorous, friendly.
  • His teaching is very effective. Examples given are very basic and easy to understand. Other CIS instructors I have had talk in a very advanced manner, which is hard to follow.
  • He is a funny guy. He is willing to admit when he is not sure of something and finds out for you.
  • I have been programming in various languages for many years. I was self-taught and good at getting the job done. Dr. Parker's teaching style helped me to learn how to program with code maintenance and good coding paradigms in mind. Excellent instructor!!!

Advanced Business Programming using Visual Basic

  • Very knowledgeable in what he teaches.
  • Very enthusiastic about class. Knowledgeable about subject matter.
  • I liked working on one major project throughout the semester. It allowed us to experience working on a large project.
  • His ability to involve all of his students. He makes you feel like you are a part of the class.
  • Was always available for questions and always did his best to answer questions fully.
  • Dr. Parker is able to explain the concepts well and the examples he used were great.
  • The homework programs were fun and matched the concepts being taught well.
  • Explained the material well and helped students. Was always available for questions.
  • He answers email questions SUPER quickly and responds to them thoroughly. Lecture notes cover everything necessary.
  • I liked how the assignments were connected together.

Fall 2007

Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic

  • He is funny and tries to be helpful. He shows great demonstrations and examples of code that we are learning.
  • I like the projects that were assigned.
  • He is excited about teaching. He is very encouraging and helpful. His teasing keeps class light and fun, which a class should partially be.
  • He was organized in his class presentations and made class fun through his sense of humor.
  • Very friendly and prompt with helping students.
  • He is funny, doesn't let students get bored.
  • Knows the material well, made it understandable, was easy to contact if I had questions.
  • Always willing to help via email, meetings, always asking what he can do to improve.
  • Great humor, lots of experience.
  • Programs were really helpful to grasp the material.
  • His willingness to help. His excitement for [the] subject matter helped me to really like it.
  • The challenge of it. I had never done any programming before and this class helped me to really like it.
  • He REALLY knows his stuff. He is very prepared for class and he is helpful to students. I really liked his sense of humor and how he conducted the classes.
  • I liked that the assignments were challenging but doable.
  • I liked having the notes available online in an easy-to-find setup.
  • You have to figure stuff out rather than simple memorization.
  • Very positive attitude, very enthusiastic. Seems well versed in subject matter.

Advanced Business Programming using Visual Basic

  • Very friendly, flexible.
  • Excited and enthusiastic, very knowledgeable.
  • He listened to our suggestions and changed the way he taught to ensure that we understood what he was teaching.

CS/CIS Graduate Technology Seminar

  • Encouraged participation.
  • He knows what he is teaching.
  • He has a good sense of humor.
  • Covers a wide range of topics.
  • He is a funny guy and makes us enjoy class even more.

Spring 2007

Sabbatical

Fall 2006

Sabbatical

Spring 2006

Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic

  • Willing to help, easy to get a hold of, always available.
  • Enthusiasm toward the subject matter, he is always available if you need help.
  • He is cool, funny, and very understanding and likeable.
  • The manner in which the material was covered.
  • His sense of humor, good use of analogies, always quick to respond to emails, very helpful.
  • Friendly and knowledgeable. I really liked the online notes; they are thorough and accurate.
  • The way he jokes around while he teaches.
  • Helped to explain theories that I didn't understand that well.

Database Design and Implementation

  • His teaching style.
  • The notes are clear and easy to understand.
  • He was extremely entertaining.
  • He was VERY willing to help his students. He answers emails even late at night, when students' frustration can be very high. Also, his classes are fun, while still challenging.
  • The fact that I finally understand what ERDs are....Previous classes had confused me a great deal on that topic.
  • Good relationship with students.
  • Very interesting and will be useful to me.

Web Development for eCommerce

  • Upbeat, fun, interactive learning environment.
  • He made the course entertaining. He was always helpful.
  • Flexible, joking around, helpful to students and always available.
  • I learned a lot – probably the funnest [sic] upper division class I've had.
  • The organization of the course; it really leveraged the knowledge of everyone in the course.

Fall 2005

Foundations of Computer Programming using Visual Basic

  • He is probably the best instructor I’ve had at ISU.
  • Dr. Parker is an awesome teacher. This is a hard class, but he is positive and helps students succeed. He makes a boring subject more interesting.
  • Truly seems to care about the success of his students; always keeps his knowledge current; answers all questions promptly and with diligence.
  • He is probably going to be one of the most memorable instructors I will have had. He expects high quality work, but it is worth the effort.
  • He cares about the success of the students – it really shows.
  • He made the class interesting and the material easier to understand.
  • Very informative, has fun with the class, interesting teaching style.
  • The instructor made sure we knew the information we learned in this class well and always answered questions we had real fast.
  • I think this course really helped my critical thinking by challenging us with problems for us to solve that we figure out ourselves rather than looking it up in a text book and following the same routine every time.
  • The notes were detailed and informative. Class lectures were helpful; we learned something from the class.
  • Was always approachable for questions.
  • Dr. Parker is great.
  • Always very available outside the class to help.
  • The course is very challenging, but the reward is greater because of it.
  • His organization and effort – probably more time spent improving lectures than any other professor.
  • The website for this class is very useful.

Database Design and Implementation

  • The ability to communicate the material to his students; his attitude towards teaching.
  • Created a relaxed atmosphere. He is awesome.
  • He’s friendly, funny, and makes class a fun experience.

Spring 2005

Web Development for eCommerce

  • Great personality, good knowledge of material, very available to work with. Give Doc Parker a raise! He deserves it!
  • He’s great at helping with questions, very friendly, makes it easy to come to him with problems, helps make things easier to understand.
  • His willingness to go the extra mile for all of his students. He also tries very hard to respond to all emails, even late at night!

Database Management Systems

  • Parker was an excellent instructor. He helped me get over my fears of CIS.
  • Made class fun.
  • Friendly, explained concepts well, concerned about the welfare of the students.
  • He keeps class interesting.
  • His enthusiasm, knowledge, and ability to connect with all students.
  • He was by far the best instructor I have had in my CIS courses. He makes very complicated stuff easy to understand – great teaching skills which many of the other CIS professors lack.
  • Very organized; easy to learn due to structure.
  • Excited about course material, gets students involved and excited as well.
  • Teaches very well.
  • He is always making sure he is available, by email or in person to help students. Also, he teaches in a manner that makes class time enjoyable and concepts easy to understand.
  • He presented the material in an interesting and entertaining way. This helped me to remember the mundane.
  • Ability to make class interesting when dealing with information that could be deemed as boring.
  • Created a relaxed atmosphere.
  • Upbeat, loves the topic.
  • His enthusiasm was great. Easy to speak with. Keep this teacher!!!
  • Great sense of humor and very knowledgeable about the subject. He made class interesting and a fun learning environment.
  • His willingness to help students; his preparedness for class sessions; his ability to communicate and explain the material adequately.

Fall 2004

Web Development for eCommerce

  • He is funny and always able to make students focus.
  • He makes things interesting and has a good sense of humor.
  • His willingness to work with students.
  • He was very well organized and gave us plenty of time to research and do our projects. He is the best teacher in the CIS department!!
  • Classes are structured to be informative and interesting. I wish all classes were designed like this.
  • Student-centered teaching and learning.
  • Class was fun and he encouraged interaction in the class with his personality and by his willingness to listen to our comments.
  • He made the class interesting. Easy to talk to.
  • Works with you – very personable.
  • He knew how to make the class interesting and fun.

Database Management Systems

  • His desire to teach and ability to connect with students. Parker has been one of my best professors ever.
  • He made class interesting and he was willing to recap stuff without getting mad. He tried to teach in a manner that all could understand.
  • Great attitude and commitment to students. Was very energetic. Seemed to care about the students.
  • Cares about the students.
  • He’s friendly, he knows the material well, he’s very available outside class for help.
  • Good humor and clear explanations.
  • Relates well to students. Ended class when we got glassy eyed without cutting content. Excellent notes that we could download.
  • Very effective and excellent teacher.
  • His enthusiasm made a rather bland topic fun and made you want to come to class.
  • I felt he cared about each student and how they did in class.
  • Dr. Parker is an excellent instructor. He always made class enjoyable. He presented information in a way that made it easy to understand.
  • He is very enthusiastic about teaching.
  • Out-stinkin-standing!
  • Dr. Parker knows the subject well. He is a talented professor who made discussions interesting. He is very helpful in answering questions. He is also enthusiastic about learning, which made the class more enjoyable.
  • Introduced levity while teaching. It helps keep you interested.
  • He makes boring material interesting. Love his illustrations.
  • His sense of humor and his knowledge and control over the course. He made the course seem real with great analogies.
  • He was very energetic. He was very organized. You knew exactly what he expected of you.
  • Very approachable and willing to help.
  • Great sense of humor and he uses it to help us understand the material.
  • His ability to make computers and DBMS seem fun, even though they are boring.

Spring 2004

Object-Oriented Development using Java

  • Good notes
  • He is a very entertaining teacher.

Database Management Systems

  • Willingness to help students and answer email.
  • I appreciate his sense of humor, his willingness to be resourceful, and his desire for students to stretch and learn.
  • Good teacher – knows a lot about real world application.
  • He had a good sense of humor and adjusted his lectures according to class signals.
  • He knows his stuff and is very excited about teaching.
  • Laughs with us and is organized and teaches well.
  • Does a great job teaching difficult information.
  • Great attitude. Made it fun to learn.
  • You are fun.
  • Made class interesting and fun.
  • His personality – he’s very flexible and willing to help. Also the notes he has are helpful.
  • He has lots of energy, very helpful.
  • Good sense of humor; willing to help.
  • Very willing to help us if we had problems.
  • He was very clear with the lectures and explained all of the concepts concisely.
  • He has a good teaching style and makes the class interesting. He is also very willing to help students outside of class when they have questions.

Fall 2003

Advanced Business Programming using Visual Basic

  • Very knowledgeable and willing to go out of his way to help.
  • Dr. Parker answers emails quicker than a jackrabbit can run.
  • Dr. Parker's notes are the best I have ever seen.
  • I liked how the instructor put a lot of time into trying to find out how to make the information as clear as possible, and how to help us understand fully what we need to know.
  • Lecture and notes were laid out and presented clearly.
  • His class notes were very thorough and he has a very good attitude. He was always enthusiastic about the class.
  • The class assignments were practical and had real-world application.
  • His high mount of involvement and participation. He put a lot of work into the course, and it showed. I've never had a teacher I could email and get a response back within minutes, even if it was 1 or 2 in the morning.
  • He had very extensive notes available for us on the Internet.
  • Easy to contact outside of class via email; willingness to meet with students outside of class time.

Database Management Systems

  • He was upbeat and witty; knowledgeable.
  • Very thorough in explaining topics.
  • He has a very effective teaching style and does not give lectures in a monotone voice.
  • He goes the extra mile outside and inside of class.
  • Very amicable and approachable.
  • Well prepared, knew what he was talking about. Willing to help students which is rare at this university.
  • Good notes. Not only a professor but a friend also. Cares about being a teacher.
  • Very willing to help, even at odd times of the day.
  • Teaching style, openness to the class and the willingness to answer questions.
  • Flexible; understood the student's perspective.
  • He is always ready and willing to help. you can tell he enjoys his work, and he portrays that to the students.
  • Dr. Parker took the time to make sure everyone understood the material and the requirements for the assignments. Help was always available either through the professor or additional materials he made available.
  • Eager to help; willing to help; provided students with needed resources.
  • He is willing to work with each student as long as is needed to get the concepts across.
  • Dynamic personality and knows his material.
  • Dr. Parker is very approachable. He cares a lot about what/how the students learn.
  • He is very helpful and knowledgeable.
  • Parker does an excellent job of teaching. We need more teachers like him....
  • He was well prepared and spent a lot of time helping students and preparing helpful information on the web. A very good professor.
  • Clear and precise; well-prepared; available after class for consultation.
  • Good teaching practices; takes an interest in students; friendly, approachable, and available.
  • He is really concerned about his students and wants us to learn. [The class] has good notes. Dr. Parker is a hard worker and does stuff to help us out – notes. I think Doc P is the man!!
  • Dr. Parker is a personable instructor. He is willing to stand to students and help them. I think that students feel comfortable asking him for help in understanding course material and project problems. Parker is a great instructor.
  • Friendly, helpful, dedicated, nice. The notes are great.
  • The instructor was very dedicated to our learning process. He made himself available for questions.
  • He tries to make ALL information interesting and he makes himself available as much as possible.
  • He made the course enjoyable and made the course subjects easier to learn.
  • Dr. Parker did a good job making his students feel that he was interested in their well being. I appreciated his prompt email responses.

Email Comments:

Thank you, Dr. Parker,

You have been a great teacher, and I consider you a personal friend. I appreciate that you expect your students to stretch, search, and apply what is taught in class. Of course, that can make assignments more difficult, but I have paid a lot of money for my education, and expect to actually learn something. I become irritated when a class becomes nothing more that a hoop or monkey-see-monkey-do.

Graduating has filled me with mixed emotions. I am excited to move on to graduate school (assuming that I am accepted), but I am also sad to leave all of the friends that I have made along the way. I will never forget the kindness and genuine concern that you have shown me over the years. Thank you so much, and best wishes to you and your family.

David Roberts


Dr. Parker -

I was a student last fall in your CIS 120 class and I just wanted to compliment the quality of your course. I have since transferred to another university where I am currently enrolled in an information system course with elements of Web Design and I am leaps and bounds ahead of all of the other students because of the content of your course. I am easily able to create web pages with javascript to the amazement of my peers. I specifically compliment your projects/assignments. Even though they were at times hard, I learned the most from them and know that your teaching style, though challenging, has been very beneficial to me.

Thanks

Chad Allen


Dr. P,

You will always be one of the great people I'll think about from ISU. I wish all my professors cared as much about me really learning as you did. Thanks!

Jacque Korenke


I just wanted to sincerely thank you for all your help with our project (especially tonight when we were keeping you from your dinner). As much as that project really SUCKED (and it really did suck at times) I really did learn a whole lot. Our group was grrrreat, I made three really good friends out of the whole thing (it's amazing how well you can bond over DFDs and HTML at 2am in the morning). It's weird to think that I didn't even know Katie and Becky before this semester, and now I don't think I'll be able to take another MIS class without them. Anyway – I just wanted to really thank you and let you know that I have enjoyed your class this semester (and I am not trying to suck up either). I really mean it.

Thanks Again!

Cortnaye Hammond


Thanks a lot for being a dedicated teacher and a great guy. I'm sure all the skills I have learned in the MIS curriculum will help me in my job at AT&T Solutions out east. Thanks again!

Dan Matzat


I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to talk and help me through this project. I have had my share of professors that just didn't care and never wanted to help out.

Cesar Keller


In my opinion you are one of the few teachers that care about his students. I appreciate everything that you have done. I want you to understand that this is the opinion of a majority of us.

Thank you

Chetan Gandhy


It has genuinely been a pleasure being taught by you. The most I have taken away from the MIS program has been from your classes. Your classes were harder than hell but I ended up learning a lot from them. You are truly an asset to the MIS program at SLU. This e-mail is in a way thanking you for all the hard work you put in teaching these classes and giving you a pat on your back. Keep on teaching.

Jamal Jumani


I just wanted to drop you a quick email to let you know that everything you taught us in SAD is right on. Not that I ever doubted you...just that the real world is hard to imagine after 16 years of constant schooling. I just got back from training with Arthur Andersen and I was pleasantly surprised at how much I already knew, even as a snot-nosed rookie.

John Williams III


Hi, I wanted to thank you for having the impact you did on my future. Your classes were the deciding factor if I was going to be an MIS major or not. I liked C, but never thought I would be able to major in the whole MIS thing cuz I did not understand very much. I also remember buying the books for your classes and thinking it was probably the biggest waste of money since I would drop the classes and have to figure out a new major (talk about self-confidence). But, anyways, I know sometimes all the teacher hears is the crabbing about the quizzes, programs, homework, and tests they give (sounds familiar), but I just wanted to tell you that I appreciated everything you have done for me in the past.

Priscilla Lim


Well, it is all over. I finally graduated. I just wanted to say thanks for being a wonderful teacher. I enjoyed being in your classes and all. You and your classes are what made me decide that I wanted to major in MIS. Thanks for everything and keep up the good work.

Priscilla Lim


I wanted to tell you that everything that you said was true about using the stuff we learned in the MIS classes at SLU. I have already, in the first two weeks, encountered data flow diagrams, task flow diagrams, flowcharts, normalization, and just about everything else that you clowns in the DEPARTMENT taught me. Basically I just wanted to be added to the list of people to tell you that you were right.

Drew Davis


I just recently took a job as a software engineer doing database work. I work on an ORACLE based product doing customer customizations and use much of the education I obtained in your database class. I truly enjoyed your class, as well as your teaching style. It had a great influence over me, and has helped me to obtain and enjoy the position I have now. I guess what I'm trying to say is thanks. You've given me much and I appreciate that.

Norbert Kuchenmeister


You told us that you appreciated the hard work that our class did this semester. I would like to express to you my appreciation for the dedication that you put into the MIS program. Thinking of the evaluation you told us that one of your past students wrote for you, I would like to say that if you are indicative of the rest of the professors in the MIS department, then I am damn proud of graduating from it!

Tim Koehler


I wanted to thank you. Not to be sappy, but you really are a great teacher. You get the students excited about what they are learning and how they are learning it. And you teach them stuff that actually applies to the business world.

Cindy Bastean, formerly with Ernst & Young


I just wanted to tell you that you are the MIS department at SLU and that you are a great professor (doctor). I've learned a lot from you and Java has sparked a programming interest in me.

Thank you Dr. Parker for your time and commitment.

Brad Argetsinger


...know that you are one of the only teachers that I feel I can have fun with, meaning you understand our generation.

Chris Smith

Service: Editorial

  • Former editor of Journal of Information Technology Education (2005-2008).
  • Member of the Editorial Board of Education and Information Technologies.
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge and Management.
  • Information Technology Management Track Chair for the North American Case Research Association (NACRA) 2007 Annual Meeting.
  • Session chair for the InSITE (Informing Science + IT Education) 2009 conference.
  • Reviewer for IEEE’s Transactions on Software Engineering, International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, Electronic Commerce Research Journal, International Journal of Electronic Commerce and Business Media, Communications of the ACM, Electronic Markets, and Mountain Plains Journal.
  • Reviewed papers for the AMCIS 2002 Intelligent Agents Track, the AMCIS 2003 Education Track, ICIS 2001, the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 Informing Science + IT Education Joint Conferences, and the 2006, 2007, and 2008 Hawaii International Conference on Systems Science (HICSS).
  • Reviewed texts for McGraw-Hill, Course Technology, Addison-Wesley, Prentice-Hall, Wiley, D.C.Heath and Company, and West Publishing Company.
  • Program Committee member of the First Online Metadata and Semantics Research Conference (MSR'05).
  • Program Committee member of the InSITE (Informing Science + IT Education) 2004 conference.

Service: Professional

  • Served on the AMCIS 2013 Recruitment Workshop faculty panel.
  • International-Linkage Member of Curtin University of Technology's Tier 1 University Research Centre – Digital Ecosystems and Business Intelligence (former member).
  • External peer reviewer for Al-Balqa Applied University 2013 Promotion and Tenure Committee (two candidates).
  • External assessor for Universiti Sains Malaysia 2012 Promotion Committee.
  • External peer reviewer for Al-Balqa Applied University 2011 Promotion and Tenure Committee (two candidates).
  • External peer reviewer for Missouri Western State University Steven L. Craig School of Business 2010 Promotion Committee.
  • External peer reviewer for the Jordan University of Science and Technology Department of Computer Information Systems 2009 Promotion Committee.
  • External peer reviewer for the University of Idaho College of Business and Economics 2008 Promotion and Tenure Committee.
  • External peer reviewer for the University of Nevada, Reno College of Business Administration 2007 Promotion and Tenure Committee.
  • External referee for Curtin University of Technology 2007 Promotion Committee.
  • Outside evaluator for the University of New Mexico-Gallup 2005 Rank and Tenure Committee.
  • External peer reviewer for the Purdue University College of Technology 2002 Promotion Committee.

Service: University

  • Participated on a faculty panel at the 2012 new faculty orientation.
  • Participated in the 2012 new student orientation.
  • Member of Athletic Advisory Board
  • Member of Campus Safety Council
  • Former member of the Campus Planning Council
  • Former member of the Technology Mediated Instruction Incentive Group
  • Served as Graduate Faculty Representative in 2004 (Educational Leadership), 2005 (Educational Leadership), and 2009 (Mechanical Engineering).
  • Member of the Saint Louis University Computer Science Advisory Committee which analyzed the impact of the consolidation of multiple campuses and its impact on the respective computer-based programs.

Service: College

  • Chair of the CIS department.
  • Member of the College of Business Executive Committee.
  • Member of the Enrollment Committee.
  • Faculty advisor of the ACM Student Group.
  • Former chair and current member of the Faculty Support Committee
  • Coordinator for United Way for ISU College of Business (2000-2008, 2012-2013).
  • Served as a member of the recruiting and interview team for new assistant professors and instructors at both Idaho State University (1999, 2000, 2004) and Saint Louis University (1996, 1996, 1997, 1998).
  • Advised students in course selection as well as career decisions.
  • Established and acted as Faculty Advisor for the MIS Club student group at Saint Louis University for three years.
  • Athletic Recruiting Liaison.
  • Member of Promotion and Tenure Committees in 2001, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009.
  • Member of MBA Orals Committees in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2100, 2012, 2013.
  • Member of recruitment committees for assistant professors and instructors at Idaho State University (1999, 2000, 2004, 2012, 2013).
  • Member of recruitment committees for assistant professors and instructors at Saint Louis University (1996, 1996, 1997, 1998).
  • Advised students in course selection as well as career decisions.
  • Founder and Faculty Advisor of the MIS Club student group at Saint Louis University (1996-1999).

Service: Dissertation & Thesis Committees

  • Kit Na Goh
    GIS Training and Research Center – Idaho State University
    Thesis Title: Developing A Geo-Spatial Search Tool Using A Relational Database Implementation of the Geo FGDC CSDGM Model
    Committee Member (Defended 2007)
  • Jiri Kadlec
    College of Science and Engineering – Idaho State University
    Dissertation Title: Design, Development, and Usability Assessment of Hydrologic Information System Tools with Case Studies in the Czech Republic
    Committee Member (Anticipated defense 2014)
  • Jessnor Elmy Mat Jizat
    School of Business IT and Logistics – RMIT University
    Dissertation Title: Investigating ICT-Literacy Assessment Tools: Developing and Validating a New Assessment Instrument for Trainee Teachers in Malaysia
    External Examiner (Defending December 2012)
  • Meghan Fisher
    College of Science and Engineering – Idaho State University
    Dissertation Topic: Quantifying and Mapping Variable Entrainment Throughout Volcanic Eruption Plumes
    Committee Member (Anticipated defense 2013)

Memberships

  • Association for Information Systems (AIS)
  • Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
  • Informing Science Institute

Honors and Awards

  • Recognized as a 2011-2012 Outstanding Master Teacher by Idaho State University.
  • Recognized as 2011 Faculty Member of the Year by the Associated Students of Idaho State University.
  • Recognized as a 2010-2011 Outstanding Master Teacher by Idaho State University.
  • Received the ISU College of Business 2005-2006 Outstanding Research Award.
  • Received the ISU College of Business 2002-2003 Outstanding Teacher Award.
  • Nominated for and selected as ACM Senior Member, recognizing demonstrated performance that sets members apart from their peers.
  • Nominated for Idaho State University Distinguished Teacher Award of 2008-2009.
  • Nominated for Idaho State University Distinguished Teacher Award of 2005-2006.
  • Received Best Paper award at the 2006 Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference
  • Received Best Paper award at the 2005 Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference
  • Received Best Paper award at the 2004 Informing Science + Information Technology Education (InSITE) Conference.
  • Received Best Paper Award at the International Business & Economics Research Conference 2001.
  • Nominated for Best Paper award at the 2003 Americas Conference on Information Systems.
  • International Who’s Who of Information Technology
  • Upsilon Pi Epsilon – Honor Society for the Computing Sciences
  • Golden Key National Honor Fraternity
  • Who's Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges
  • Psi Theta chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, a national honor fraternity (President)

Grants & Fellowships

  • Curtin University of Technology Research Fellowship, 2007
  • Idaho State University College of Business Reuttgers Grant: "Pedagogical Database Development," 2003
  • Idaho State University College of Business Reuttgers Grant: "Using Technology to Teach Accounting - Computer Assisted Critical Thinking," 2002
  • Idaho State University College of Business Reuttgers Grant: "An Instrument for the Selection of a Programming Language to be Used in Introductory and Advanced Programming Classes," 2002
  • Saint Louis University School of Business and Administration Summer Research Grant: "A Metadata Approach for Mapping Electronic Resources: Cataloging Research Materials On the Web," 1998
  • Saint Louis University School of Business and Administration Summer Research Grant: "Enhanced Internet Search Techniques: An Alternative Push Technology," 1997
  • Saint Louis University School of Business and Administration Summer Research Grant: "A Multi-Class User Definition for Information Filtering," 1996

Technical Capabilities

  • Curriculum design
  • Course development
  • Training and instruction in information systems and computer science topics
  • Programming language expertise
  • Software analysis, design, implementation,and maintenance
  • Object-oriented design
  • Database design
  • SQL and SQL*Plus
  • SQL Server
  • Oracle Designer 2000
  • Systems analysis and design tools
  • Software feasibility studies
  • User interface design
  • User training
  • Artificial intelligence systems design

Programming and Design Languages

  • Java
  • C#.Net
  • C++
  • C
  • Visual Basic.Net
  • ASP.Net
  • Pascal
  • FORTRAN
  • HTML 5
  • CSS 3
  • JavaScript
  • VB Script
  • PHP
  • LISP
  • PL/I
  • ALGOL
  • Ada
  • BASIC
  • COBOL
  • RPG
  • SNOBOL
  • APL
  • Assembly Languages

Vitae

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X

Current Evaluation Questions

The current evaluation is phrased in a less straightforward manner. To assess teaching effectivemess, I averaged all teaching effectiveness related questions:

For Course Effectiveness I used the following question:

X

Intermediate Evaluation Questions

The Instructor's overall teaching effectiveness is:   1 Very Poor  |  Poor  |  Average  |  Good  |  5 Excellent

What was your attitude toward this course before taking it?   1 Very Unfavorable  |  Unfavorable  |  Average  |  Favorable  |  5 Very Favorable

What is your attitude toward this course now?   1 Very Unfavorable  |  Unfavorable  |  Average  |  Favorable  |  5 Very Favorable

How much do you think you have learned from this course?   1 Very Little  |  Little  |  Average Amount  |  Much  |  5 Very Much

X

Old Evaluation Questions

The Instructor's overall teaching effectiveness is?:   1 Very Poor  |  Poor  |  Good  |  4 Very Good

What was your attitude toward this course before taking it?   1 Very Unfavorable  |  Unfavorable  |  Favorable  |  4 Very Favorable

What is your attitude toward this course now?   1 Very Unfavorable  |  Unfavorable  |  Favorable  |  4 Very Favorable

How much do you think you have learned from this course?   1 Very Little  |  Little  |  Much  |  4 Very Much